Made for Harrods of London

Vintage limited edition Staffordshire fruit and veg bowl in pretty bone china made for Harrods by Bishop and Stonier (Bisto) dating from between 1891 and 1936. Numbered 232.

Hand painted flowers surrounded by a cobalt and in a gold plated design. All in good condition for its age except for hairline on underside. No crazing or chips.

This mark (Caduceus) was registered as a trade mark by Powell & Bishop in 1876 the mark was also used by subsequent partnerships including Bishop & Stonier.

The “BISTO” trade name was only used by
Bishop and Stonier and often appeared (but not always) with the two marks shown above.

Incredible find.

To view these items in detail; please visit my ebay store:

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

About Silver Teapots

An old English antique silver teapot is a lovely addition and very Shabby Chic addition in any home. I bought this one the other day. I was looking for something to put fresh cut flowers in for my table. But when I found this Teapot it was black with soot and grime.

What was I thinking? But anyway I decided to clean it only to only to discover it was real Silver…. an old English Silver maker; Mappin and Webb…. and

Just think… I was was going to put flowers in it after I cleaned the ole Mappin; We tested her… Jim heated the water. I watched her steam up nicely, holding in the heat. We poured. A cuppa of Ceylon tea. We added sugar; stirred. I sipped and closed my eyes. The taste was lovely.

It’s not all that hard to keep it in good working order and only requires minimal effort. Regular use and washing will prevent stains and tarnish from developing.

Wash the teapots in warm water with a mild, non-lemon scented dish washing soap, according to the English Silver smiths.

How to Clean a Silver Teapot

Step 1

Wet a cellulose sponge with water and wring it out. If the opening of the teapot is too small for your hand, wrap the sponge around a dowel or small spatula.

Step 2

Apply a quarter-size dollop of silver cleaning cream to the sponge. Silversmiths recommend using Silver Cream as a safe, mild cleaning agent.

Step 3

Rub the inside of the teapot with the sponge to remove tarnish and tea stains. Push the sponge into the teapot with the dowel if necessary.

Step 4

Dip a cotton swab in cleaning cream. Wipe the spout with the cotton swab to clean it.

Step 5

Rinse the teapot in warm water and dry with a soft, lint-free cloth.

Removing Tough Stains

Step 6

Fill teapot with warm water.

Step 7

Drop one denture cleaning tablet in the water. Wait ten minutes. The effervescing action of the denture tablet loosens tough stains and tarnish from the teapot.

Step 8

Pour the water into the sink and rinse the teapot with warm water. Gently brush any remaining stains with a wet brush.

Step 9

Dry the teapot with a soft cloth.

Japanese Tanba

Tanba-yaki” pottery originated approximately 800 years ago and has played an essential role in people’s daily lives, as well as becoming sought after as artwork in recent years.

Using ash and iron glazes, everyday articles with a rustic tenor are the mainstay of this ware.

It is fired in a noborigama take on a very distinctive coloring and surface texture because of the way that the ash from the pine logs used to fire the kiln blows about.

The ash mixes with the glaze to produce interesting effects which are accepted and called haikaburi, and gives each piece its own individual character.

Its distinguishing feature is its simplicity and absence of decorative flourishes. It consists mainly of tableware made for daily use, made with a view to being a part of daily life.

Practical knowledge about daily life was drawn on in making Tanba-yaki pottery, so that the finished product is easy to use, and to the touch imparts a sense of the warmth of the earth and of the people.

Emotions


When he said, “I just want you to stay.” To do whatever it takes to keep me in you my arms. Stay with me even if times are challenging because I know you love me. I know that this is true. 

Working on a Further Leave to Remain to stay here with you. The application process means hundreds of questions; lots of requirements; meeting every one. Submissions of different documents, photos and proofs; it’s really me; it is a true test of wills where the equation is patience, endurance and emotions. 

Why does the truth require proof. I guess it means there are emotional forces here aligned with the strategy and purpose. I know the universe exist; Do I really need to know how the entire universe works? Can it be simplified into equations? 

I think some people speak as if the universe is something to be solved, but not experienced. Somehow I don’t believe equations take into factor human nature; or how we as humans tend to navigate by emotion and not always by logic or proof.

Logic if too constrained by rules is fundamentally flawed when applied to anything with a heart of its own because the heart is organic; yet a living matter. I am living matter. We are. And organic, with heart; perfect and flawed. 


So, I’ll get to stay 
Excited about what may
So we’ll never be apart
You have my whole heart
You are enough proof 
Love for all you do
Answer to the equation 
Love needs no explanation 
For you; This I am grateful;
Thankful…
For you; 
Emotion.

Le Voyage

Bonjour!

I have always loved to travel. Sometimes it’s risky leaving home, going on an adventure to another country, then going through customs and then border patrols.

Those are times when we share new loves and new conversations talking about settling somewhere new. What if”s are fun… refreshing. Perhaps looking for a job or even a new house anyone knows that it is risky. But, I think sometimes the heart overtakes reason and you just want to hit the road.

We are on our way to Paris, just for a few days. Taking the ferry from Dover to Calais. We’re diving with doggies and it’s only for a few days. They even have their own passports.

Maybe we don’t get paid when to travel, but the return is priceless; it’s healing for the soul; it’s a breath of life, energy and refreshing to the mind and body.

And nevertheless; Luckily, when I return home I will be starting a new job soon. I’ll be ready to come back to work. I don’t mind because I love to experience new places and people.

Anyway, travelling is a high for me. I think to some it can be so overwhelming when it’s on demand rather than inspired.  Like when it’s for work rather than pleasure.

Taking a spontaneous journey requires passion, believing in yourself and your partner. A journey is about creating a believable story, despite timing setbacks, and enduring to understand a different language. I’m attempting to learn French. The doggies understand it better than I do!

Travel takes fortitude. Then you have to write about it and photograph it and publish your experience.

So we share the joy of the road; Jim and I, we travel with our chihuahua’s; Boubou and Daisy. They are lovely companions; against all odds and despite all; I love this view from the road with them.

Although, I don’t think I go alone or even complete a thought on paper without them.

Travel requires learning the craft of road and the motion of thought and all that goes with the journey. But then, I always look forward going back home and to work so we can hit the road again next summer.

Au revoir…until we meet again.

Roman Bath, Somerset, UK

Bath, in Somerset, South West England, near south-east of Bristol, Wales; I’d like walking back in time. Many of the roads are still cobblestone.

The city, is in the valley of the River Avon, and a World Heritage Site since 1987.

The city had the Latin name Aquae; “the waters of Sulis,” since AD 60 when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although oral tradition suggests that the hot springs were known before then.

Bath Abbey was founded in the 7th century becoming a religious centre and the building was rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries.

Since the 17th century claims were made for the curative properties of the water from the springs and Bath became popular as a spa town during the Georgian era, leaving a heritage of Georgian architecture crafted from Bath stone, including the Royal Crescent, Circus, Pump Room and Assembly Rooms.

Bath may have been the site of the Battle of Badon (c. 500 AD), in which King Arthur is said to have defeated the Anglo-Saxons.

The city fell to the West Saxons in 577 after the Battle of Deorham; the Anglo-Saxon poem, “The Ruin” may describe the appearance of the Roman site about this time.

The Wineburg House

IMG_0298

Together they found a home, it was more than a place to live. 

There they would prepare their feast, breaking bread together, partaking in the ritual wine ceremonies, as if going to church. 

To them it was like participating in a holy sacrament, feeding each other with a blessing of thanksgiving. 

And it was there in that house, it was there where their lives and love would unfold and multiplying the joy they would find in the ach others company. 

Of holding hands over the sheets in the morning for days and weeks and years to come. 

To wake up gently every morning, smiling, Grazing, watching, waking, laughing, working and sleeping, loving, living. 

It was a place where they were happy to repeat it again and again, so long as they were simply together in a place they called home.