For the Love of Julien

On his birthday.

About Oxwich Castle

Oxwich Bay Castle; a hilltop fortress haunted

Rising from ruins of early Tudor times,

It’s appearance more of a fortified stately home;

A magnificent mansion it was.

It was built to impress the influential.

Made from the treasures of shipwrecks there.

Rising on the site of an earlier fortification.

With a castle gate bearing of innocent blood,

A scene of a once mortal battle.

The daughter of Sir Mansel who’s grief is bared.

Men Fighting over lost stolen treasures there.

Barrels of wine from France; and the like;

Pots, pans, fancy dress and mustard seed.

Fighting were two of the Gower’s families;

The Mansel’s and the Herberts; disputing

When Sir Mansel’s daughter appeared,

Her aim was to the resolve,

Sir Mansel, it was her innocence he feared.

Over the stolen booty Sir Mansel held.

Refusing the real owner to reconcile or detour,

A feud engaged over this stolen treasure,

But there within the Mansel household,

When his daughter appeared at the gate amure.

Caught in the fire; for it was too late,

There was no peace to be made

As Sir Mansel refused to negotiate.

For the booty was Herberts stolen from the sea,

And it was not to be had; not owned by he.

Miss Anne was killed for the treasures taken,

She was met by a miss thrown stone.

A Stone was meant for Sir Mansel himself.

Instead of gain; his daughter struck lain.

An innocent life; Miss Anne was gone;

Sir Mansel, her life was lost; he grieved in pain,

Bereaved for what he had exchanged;

A shipwrecked treasure feigned,

All for the life of his daughter he gave.

******

From the shores of Oxwich Bay the Mansel family found many an opportunity to gain advantage of their location to the beach were the first to plunder lots sailing ships that wrecked near the rocks at Oxwich Beach.

However, such eager salvaging brought disaster upon the family when, in 1557, Sir Rhys Mansel took possession of the riches from a certain French trading ship that had come to grief off Oxwich Point during a gale.

The salvage rights to this vessel, to some extent, also belonged to a Sir George Herbert, one of the most important and powerful men of Swansea at the time, and he and his men soon descended upon Oxwich Castle.

Fearing an ensuing argument, between Herbert and his men and Mansel and his own, would turn bloody, when Sir Rhys Mansel’s daughter, Anne, rushed outside the castle to intervene and reconcile the two sides.

However, as she intervened, she was struck by a stone thrown which resulted in her death six days later.

References from:

http://cadw.gov.wales/daysout/oxwichcastle/?lang=en

Old Ming Pot

Could it be Ming?

I am to believe I may have an antique Chinese koi Bowl from the Ming Period in my procession.

It is bronze and is a cloisonné enamel bowl. The bowl measures 11.2 inches across at its widest and 3.4 inches high.

The bowl is bronze with beautiful multi color enameling throughout the piece. The iron work and rims have a dark patina or color which is all original to the piece. Incredible find.

What makes this bowl very special is that the outside and interior of the bowl are decorated with fine and enamelings and there is a scroll border along the top rim.

The bronze is glazed in a dark blue green with gilded scrolls, koi and lotus flowers.

The center bowl is in excellent condition, as is the stand.

If you look at the many photographs for more on the look and condition as they are an important part of the description.

The Zhengde Emperor (Chinese: 正德; pinyin: Zhèngdé) was the Ming dynasty Emperor of China between 1505–1521.

Reign: 19 June 1505 – 20 April 15

What do you think?

Is it Ming…or just an old Ming Pot.

Old Copper

Just an old vintage copper platter tray I found. It looked lonely laying there in that box on the ground. But somethings just appear out of nowhere; especially when your not expecting them to.

I felt an attraction immediately. I don’t know that there is anything special about this old copper platter. Perhaps, although it looks as if A king could have been served a leg of lamb from this platter.

Jim told me not to but it, but I did. Only a few shillings, (sterling) I think. He said it looks as if has been run over by a wagon train a few times.

It’s very old, yet it’s charm still remains. I bet it has a story. Probably goes back to the Dutch East Indies, but I don’t know. I found it in Amsterdam this summer. Brought it home and gave it some love and found the etchings. Maybe someone will know where it came from. I hope.

This is a round in diameter and it has a scalloped copper edge. The platter is intricately engraved writing. It is made of heavy gauge copper and is very sturdy.

I guess I will never know it’s past, but anyway I still love this old copper platter.

Emotions


When he said, “I just want you to stay.” To do whatever it takes to keep me in you my arms. Stay with me even if times are challenging because I know you love me. I know that this is true. 

Working on a Further Leave to Remain to stay here with you. The application process means hundreds of questions; lots of requirements; meeting every one. Submissions of different documents, photos and proofs; it’s really me; it is a true test of wills where the equation is patience, endurance and emotions. 

Why does the truth require proof. I guess it means there are emotional forces here aligned with the strategy and purpose. I know the universe exist; Do I really need to know how the entire universe works? Can it be simplified into equations? 

I think some people speak as if the universe is something to be solved, but not experienced. Somehow I don’t believe equations take into factor human nature; or how we as humans tend to navigate by emotion and not always by logic or proof.

Logic if too constrained by rules is fundamentally flawed when applied to anything with a heart of its own because the heart is organic; yet a living matter. I am living matter. We are. And organic, with heart; perfect and flawed. 


So, I’ll get to stay 
Excited about what may
So we’ll never be apart
You have my whole heart
You are enough proof 
Love for all you do
Answer to the equation 
Love needs no explanation 
For you; This I am grateful;
Thankful…
For you; 
Emotion.

Swansea Bay ~  South Wales Evening Post

Swansea Bay (WelshBae Abertawe)

On the southern coast of Wales

Where five rivers flow through it

Banking into the bay, out into the Irish Sea

And all the upper reaches of the Bristol Channel

Experiencing one of the largest tidal ranges 

In the entire world.

 

Maybe missing a place,  are about the places that call you back. Like the feeling you have to return, or go there again or else you you might die. Wales is that place for me. 
Even though we had our writing; We write everyday, but I think it’s was our way communicating and our way of staying connected. 
What I miss walks in the park and long conversation, lots of beach time, cooking, dining out, cooking, reading and writing everyday, there’s lots to see and everywhere to go to take lots of photographs, and day trips, shopping in the Markets and Sunday fairs and river cruises down  the Tawe River to Landovey.
Wales is a place of bed & breakfast stays and morning coffee, Sunday paper, galleries and museums, and long weekends in London with you. Weekend drives to the mountains or all day at the beach. I never did get bored hanging out.
 
Maybe take a antique road trip to find a treasure or something to set our heart afire. I can hear your sweet words of excitement when you do. 
 
I am already almost ready to return to the the British Isle’s. To begin a life long romance with life in Wales. For this and all the summers to come. Looking forward, maybe see you next Sunday.
 
All I know is that, its everything that feels right in this world. 

23 startling pictures which show this isn’t just a bay, it’s Swansea Bay | South Wales Evening Post.

Swansea Castle

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I love exploring castles. Mostly I think what I love most is the history behind the castle walls. It’s as thrilling than any book I could read and Swansea Castle is one of them. I hope you enjoy.

Swansea Castle was built by the Normans just 40 years after William the Conqueror’s famous victory over King Harold at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

After various other unsuccessful attacks the castle fell in 1217 but was restored to the English in 1220 as part of the settlement between Llywelyn ap Iorwerth and Henry III of England. Immediately after this the inner castle was probably walled in stone with at least one tower.

Swansea Castle, with its turrets, arrow openings and intricate stonework has survived numerous attacks from Welsh rebels and even the German Luftwaffe.

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The visible remains consist of the north and south blocks, probably the work of William de Braose III, connected by a short stretch of much-altered curtain wall. The curtain wall originally continued up Castle Bailey Street on the west, and west from the north block to enclose a roughly rectangular area, with an entrance on the west side.

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The well-preserved south block, which occupied most of the south side of the castle, is the most spectacular part, with its picturesque arcaded parapet on top of the outside walls.

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The small rectangular tower to the ed into a debtor’s prison. It had probably been used as a prison for a long time before, and still has grim air.

Other usable parts of the castle had very heterogeneous uses at the beginning of the 19th century – as a town hall, poor-house, a new market house, store cellars, a blacksmith’s and other shops, a Roman Catholic chapel (in the hall) and a dovecote.

References:
http://www.castlewales.com/swansea.html
http://www.clickonwales.org/2011/09/opening-a-door-to-our-heritage/
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_castles_in_Wales
http://cadw.wales.gov.uk/daysout/swanseacastle/?lang=en