Applesauce Recipe ~ Wynberg House

There is a collection of apples trees in Singleton park in Sketty. They fall freely from the trees; sweet, juicy and ripened. Organic and ready for collecting. Max and I go and collect them everyday.

Organic Apples vary in their sweetness level, depending on the variety and how late in the season they are found. This recipe is just a guideline and the amount of sugar can be adjusted to your taste.

You can use less sugar than this recipe suggest, and by adding squeezed lemon juice brightens the flavor of the apples and balances the sweetness.

Try using ground cinnamon when you can cook the apples or with a stick of cinnamon, just remove it before puréeing.

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 to 4 lbs of apples (about 7 to 10 apples, depending on the size), peeled, cored, and quartered.
  • 2 squeezes of lemon about 3 Tbsp lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Up to 1/2 – 1 cup of white sugar
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • Method
  • Prep the apples; Rinse the apples with cool water. Peel all the apples using a sharp vegetable peeler or paring knife and cut away the outer peel. Then quarter the apples and use a paring knife to cut out the tough core parts from the quarters.

    Boil peeled, cored, quartered apples with lemon, cinnamon, sugar, salt in 1 cup water: Place the peeled, cored, and quartered apples into a large pot. Add the lemon juice or vinegar, cinnamon, sugar, water and salt. (You might want to start with half the sugar at this point and add more to taste later.)

    Bring to a boil on high heat, then lower the temperature, cover the pot, and maintain a low simmer for 15-20 minutes, or until the apples are completely tender and cooked through.

    Once the apples are cooked through, remove the pot from the heat.

    For a smoother applesauce you can either use a blender or the cooked the apples 10 – 12 more minutes.

    If the applesauce is too thick, add more water to thin it out and cook a bit longer and stir.

    If not sweet enough, add more sugar to taste. If too sweet, add more lemon juice.

    This applesauce is delicious. I serve it with breakfast as a fruit starter. It is delicious either hot or chilled. It pairs well with pork chops for savory dishes, it’s terrific with cottage cheese as a snack or light lunch, and it’s great with vanilla ice cream or yogurt.

    Freezes well and will last at least a year in a cold freezer. If you freeze it, make sure to allow enough headroom in your jar for expansion. At least an inch.

    If you want to can your applesauce in jars; just spoon in the sauce, add the lids, then place the jars in an water bath on high heat for 10 minutes and tighten the lids and the jars will seal. Refrigerate after opening.

    Places in Sketty- Singleton Park

    Parc Singleton Sgeti (Welsh)

    Near Wynberg House in Sketty Swansea is Vivian Road and Sketty Green.

    The village of Sketty is centred on Sketty Cross which are the junction roads to Gower Road, Vivian Road, De-la-Beche and Dillwyn Road is the amazing historic Singleton Park.

    When you enter Singleton Park from Gower Road in Sketty; there to the north is a walk that leads down a shallow green valley, it’s open to beautiful flanked trees belted by wide open rolling hills of green spaces.

    Those along the east are ancient lime, horse chestnut, sweet chestnut and pine trees. To the west of the walk is the Gorsedd Circle of stones.

    The stones are known as the Gorsedd Stone Circle. It was erected in Singleton Park, Swansea in 1925 for the National Eisteddfod of Wales’ Proclamation Ceremony.

    To the south of the Gorsedd Circle, set in the bank below the east side of the old kitchens and gardens that once served the Vivian Copper Barons of Swansea. Just below is a semi-sunk, water wheel in a stone pit that brought the water up to the house.

    There are orchards of trees on the bank; mainly horse chestnuts, sweet chestnuts and conifers. Their fruits have fallen, some still green into the shade labored underneath its branches.

    A small stream bed, with some rocks, runs southwards to a damp area made into a bog garden. A gravel path winds along the slope.

    Near the south side of the botanical garden are the footings of a stone wall, probably the remains of the south wall of the original Veranda garden.

    A flight of concrete steps in the middle leads down to a path flanked by fastigiate yews and a gravel terrace with seats. On the south boundary is a fence and hedge.

    All this was part of the Veranda House was first built in 1799-1800 on land which had been part of Gwerniddiff Farm, on the site of the farmhouse.

    The Singleton Estate as it had now become had amalgamated some 12 farms to amass 250 acres. By 1851 the Walled Garden had become the kitchen and flower garden that once served the needs of the Vivian family.

    The property where the Botanical Garden is now of 44 acres includes the garden grounds, and former Vivian plantation. The seeds that were planted have sown, taken root in soil lined essays and poetry of the earth; Tended to with great care.

    In 1847 John Henry Vivian purchased Veranda House for his son Henry Hussey Vivian and his wife Jessie. Within a year Jessie had died after giving birth to their son.

    Henry was distraught and resolved not to live in the house and by 1853 only the estate lodge remained, the principal part of Veranda having been dismantled. St Paul’s Church Sketty, was built as a memorial to Jessie.

    The approach is the main and service drives from the north, a branch from the main drive leading to a small, rectangular walled garden to the west.

    There are grounds to the north of the house that remain today and a narrow garden area, bounded by a wall, to the south. To the south of there was a rectangular orchard.

  • The old Veranda garden wall was retained, but a bigger area of c. 5 acres was enclosed to its north by a high; a curving wall, most of which remains today with a round tower.
  • The inner (Veranda) walled garden survived until at least 1914. It was situated on the area now occupied by the gardeners of the botanical garden. Its north wall is incorporated into the walled garden.

    The footings of the garden’s south wall have been found in a flowerbed in the botanical garden.

    The modern Swansea botanical garden has been developed on the part where the old Veranda House and Singleton Farm is now thanks to the Vivian Family.

    Singleton park was originally part of the Vivian family Estate, which was purchased by Swansea County Borough Council in 1919 for use as a public park.

    This is where I walk almost everyday. It is so beautiful I had to find out how it all became this and wanted to share the wonders of this place.

    The brilliant legacy of Singleton will never fade. A fragile memory still lingers here in the colors of the trees and in the People who once call it home.

    References;

    http://orapweb.rcahms.gov.uk/coflein//C/CPG252.pdf

    http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/19964/details/singleton-farm

    Good Morning Wales – Walking in Wales

    Singleton Park Botanical Garden, Wales, UK

    Good Morning Wales

    There are days when we go places, taking  long walks. It’s when I  take long walks in the park; walking with the dog, it inspires me and even if rather it seems, that he is walking me. I don’t mind. 

    And even if its pouring down rain, he doesn’t seem to care, neither do I.  My feet get wet down to my socks finding I have to change them at least three times a day.  Wool is best and I usually find a pair of his, hoping he doesn’t mind. 

    The dog is named Bo and is part chihuahua; he is like our child. I think he’s more Welsh and maybe even part Golden Retriever, and he doesn’t seem to mind the cold or the rain, he like to retrieve; visiting every canine we pass by. 

    Singleton Park Woods, Wales, UK

    He carries himself with great confidence of spirit; and only a foot tall at that, through the park we do not missing one tree or a friendly person or another dog, rain or shine. And on these walks, it’s something I look forward to and on a daily basis. It’s like I never see the same thing twice. 

    Living so close, just a few blocks from Singleton Park is glorious. I can see why he chose to live here. 

     

    Scultured Garden, Singleton Park


    These immaculate grounds are astonishing, originally part of the Vivian family estate, which was purchased by Swansea County Borough Council in 1919. 

    The park covers 250 acres of land.  It’s just across facing the Swansea Bay, right on the beach.  It includes a botanical garden, Egyptian Studies Museum, boating lake, Swansea University and a hospital and cottages. 
     
    Some days I’ll find a park bench and start writing, waiting looking out towards the bay, s feel of the breeze in hopes that you will pass by. 

    Then there are days when I just watch, looking at other people and in those eyes, just a glimpse, they will be crying, never looking up, staring at their feet, like wildflowers, ignoring all the beauty around them. 

      

    I feel it more than I can see it. The glazed eyes begging for help or a friendly word, but concerned that everyone who passes will be too busy. 

    So I know I am blessed, to be content with the day; just to be walking in Wales and wearing your socks. To feel you here, the beauty of this place; and just be happy to nod my head, in appreciation, to say, “Good Morning and Thank you and that I love you.”

     
    And to be be walking in Wales with you.