Wolfman Tribute

Peter Wolfe (Wolfman) is infamous for writing the song “For Lovers” together with Pete Doherty. During this time Wolfman created an original mixed media, oil.

The hand painted wood collage is elebrating the life of John Lennon on wood panel by Peter Wolfe (Wolfman). The subject matter speaks for itself.

Detailed accents, hand painted by the artist (who clearly recognises Lennon, adding just a little extra to this one of a kind custom piece.

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Artist: Peter Wolfe

Medium: Mixed Media Oil & Photo Collage on Wood Panel, Hand-painted with photos collaged – matte varnish finish.

Age: 1980’s

Framed: Yes – see photos – black/wood

Size: Painting 24″ x 36″

Condition: Good Vintage

Style: Realism – Music Themed

*Artist Background:

Peter Wolfe (Wolfman) recorded “For Lovers” together with Pete Doherty. Wolfe had written the song in the mid 1990’s.

This single was Wolfe’s biggest success as musician, reaching #7 in the UK Singles Chart.

The success of the single, which was nominated for an Ivor Novello Award for songwriting.

Wolfe was also the subject of a film documentary commissioned for The Other Side on Channel Four in the UK. The film was titled, “The Greatest Unknown Rock ‘n’ Roll Star.”

Shipping: Courier Service available. Contact me for options.

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Blue and White

There is a true allure of collecting blue and white pottery. I believe it is that some people like myself…just love it. I love the design, the color, and the patterns.

Many have traveled across oceans; traded for a meal; served our family’s and Royalty. As our lives change; then suddenly we are able to appreciate the culture behind the art of the potter, instead of the pot being merely useful.

Old plates, vases and teapots, I think, have a secret history; I can imagine dinners with a silent backstory of conversations over tea and cake. Presentation is important. Make a fuss! It’s a shows love and respect to your family and your guests.

If you are going to collect blue and white; Buy pre-loved and or pre-owned. It’s keeps old pots out of landfills; recycle and reuse. We have to be mindful of our environment too.

My eyes have been caught up by the simple beauty of every day common pottery made remarkable by the colour blue and the brilliance of shape.

This is my table and I’m just getting started.

About Silver Teapots

An old English antique silver teapot is a lovely addition and very Shabby Chic addition in any home. I bought this one the other day. I was looking for something to put fresh cut flowers in for my table. But when I found this Teapot it was black with soot and grime.

What was I thinking? But anyway I decided to clean it only to only to discover it was real Silver…. an old English Silver maker; Mappin and Webb…. and

Just think… I was was going to put flowers in it after I cleaned the ole Mappin; We tested her… Jim heated the water. I watched her steam up nicely, holding in the heat. We poured. A cuppa of Ceylon tea. We added sugar; stirred. I sipped and closed my eyes. The taste was lovely.

It’s not all that hard to keep it in good working order and only requires minimal effort. Regular use and washing will prevent stains and tarnish from developing.

Wash the teapots in warm water with a mild, non-lemon scented dish washing soap, according to the English Silver smiths.

How to Clean a Silver Teapot

Step 1

Wet a cellulose sponge with water and wring it out. If the opening of the teapot is too small for your hand, wrap the sponge around a dowel or small spatula.

Step 2

Apply a quarter-size dollop of silver cleaning cream to the sponge. Silversmiths recommend using Silver Cream as a safe, mild cleaning agent.

Step 3

Rub the inside of the teapot with the sponge to remove tarnish and tea stains. Push the sponge into the teapot with the dowel if necessary.

Step 4

Dip a cotton swab in cleaning cream. Wipe the spout with the cotton swab to clean it.

Step 5

Rinse the teapot in warm water and dry with a soft, lint-free cloth.

Removing Tough Stains

Step 6

Fill teapot with warm water.

Step 7

Drop one denture cleaning tablet in the water. Wait ten minutes. The effervescing action of the denture tablet loosens tough stains and tarnish from the teapot.

Step 8

Pour the water into the sink and rinse the teapot with warm water. Gently brush any remaining stains with a wet brush.

Step 9

Dry the teapot with a soft cloth.

The Bluebell

Bluebell

By Anne Bronte

A fine and subtle spirit dwells

In every little flower,

Each one its own sweet feeling breathes

With more or less of power.

There is a silent eloquence

In every wild bluebell

That fills my softened heart with bliss

That words could never tell.

Yet I recall not long ago

A bright and sunny day,

‘Twas when I led a toilsome life

So many leagues away;

That day along a sunny road

All carelessly I strayed,

Between two banks where smiling flowers

Their varied hues displayed.

Before me rose a lofty hill,

Behind me lay the sea,

My heart was not so heavy then

As it was wont to be.

Less harassed than at other times

I saw the scene was fair,

And spoke and laughed to those around,

As if I knew no care.

But when I looked upon the bank

My wandering glances fell

Upon a little trembling flower,

A single sweet bluebell.

Whence came that rising in my throat,

That dimness in my eye?

Why did those burning drops distil –

Those bitter feelings rise?

O, that lone flower recalled to me

My happy childhood’s hours

When bluebells seemed like fairy gifts

A prize among the flowers,

Those sunny days of merriment

When heart and soul were free,

And when I dwelt with kindred hearts

That loved and cared for me.

I had not then mid heartless crowds

To spend a thankless life

In seeking after others’ weal

With anxious toil and strife.

‘Sad wanderer, weep those blissful times

That never may return!’

The lovely floweret seemed to say,

And thus it made me mourn.

Sadler Wellington Bluebell Vintage Tea Cup Set. England c1950s. Bone china. A tea cup produced; a highly regarded English china company; Sadler.

Cornish Slipware Pottery

Vintage Slipware Jug from St Ives Studio Pottery in a Ceramic 3-D Pitcher From Cornwall.

Wetheriggs Pottery, had been used from 1855 as a brick and tile works and as a pottery from about 1860. The Schofields were employees there, and they bought the company in 1913. It was run by Harold Thorburn who was a member of the Schofield family.

The earthenware pots produced there were variously marked ‘Schofield’, ‘Wetheriggs’, ‘Penrith’, ‘Cumberland’ and ‘Thorburn’. Any of these might be combined, and the word ‘Pottery’ included. There is also a suggestion that a monogram ‘TH’ was sometimes used. The monogram is on the bottom of the Jug.

Minimalist Buddha

We found this Buddha sculpture In Swansea the other day. I didn’t really know what kind of Buddha it was, but something spoke to me to take it home.

This minimalist beautiful art figurine depicts a Zen Buddha sitting in meditation. The artist utilises a unique design that suggests meditation, as the heart and mind rise above the loins. Hand-carved from suar wood.

The Buddha sits in meditation with no focus on the details of the eyes, nose and mouth. It was designed a detail-less which adds to the magic of the whole.

You can place a Buddha wherever it can be noticed by the eyes of another; it’s calming and serene. Often it will allow for holistic sensations and hence praise is bound to be received by you.

To me, a Zen Buddha is serene every which way you look at it. It’s very beautiful; one of the most extraordinary I’ve found so far.

Zen traces its origins to India but it was formalized in China. Chan, as it is known in China, was transmitted to Japan and took root there in the thirteenth century.

Chan was enthusiastically received in Japan, especially by the Samurai that wielded political power at this time, and it became the most prominent form of Buddhism between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries.

The immigrant Chinese prelates were educated men, who introduced not only religious practices but also Chinese literature, art, sculpture, calligraphy, philosophy, and ink painting to their Japanese disciples, who often in turn traveled to China for further study.

Tanba-Yaki

These old Japanese pottery Sake cups were made by Tanba Ware. It is a Blue Green Brown pottery process where the clay is covered with sand and then fired to a light brown glaze.

The original light blue glaze is developed with sand and poured on during the firing process set into the firewood only for a few days.

Tanba Ware originated approximately 800 years ago and has played an essential role in people’s daily lives, as well as becoming sought after as artwork in recent years.

Its distinguishing feature is its simplicity and absence of decorative flourishes. It consists mainly of tableware made for daily use, made with a view to being a part of daily life.

Practical knowledge about daily life was drawn on in making Tanba-yaki pottery, so that the finished product is easy to use, and to the touch imparts a sense of the warmth of the earth and of the people.

I love the colours. So warm