Wynken, Blynken and Nod

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod” is a popular poem for children written by American writer and poet Eugene Field and published on March 9, 1889.

The original title was “Dutch Lullaby”. The poem is a fantasy bed-time story about three children sailing and fishing among the stars from a boat which is a wooden shoe. The names suggest a sleepy child’s blinking eyes and nodding head.

“Story Time” of My Book House series edited by Olive Beaupre Miller and published by The Book House for Children of Chicago. Copyrighted by Miller in 1937 and 1950.

This was my favourite poem when I was a child. I remember my grandmother reading it to me and I so loved that time we had together. I am so grateful that she shared this with me. I miss her very much. I love you and miss you Mary Beatrice. This poem is for you.

Wynken, Blynken and Nod by Eugene Field

Wynken, Blynken, and Nod one night
Sailed off in a wooden shoe —
Sailed on a river of crystal light,
Into a sea of dew.
“Where are you going, and what do you wish?”
The old moon asked the three.
“We have come to fish for the herring fish
That live in this beautiful sea;
Nets of silver and gold have we!”
Said Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.

The old moon laughed and sang a song,
As they rocked in the wooden shoe,
And the wind that sped them all night long
Ruffled the waves of dew.
The little stars were the herring fish
That lived in that beautiful sea —
“Now cast your nets wherever you wish —
Never afraid are we”;
So cried the stars to the fishermen three:
Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.

All night long their nets they threw
To the stars in the twinkling foam —
Then down from the skies came the wooden shoe,
Bringing the fishermen home;
‘Twas all so pretty a sail
 it seemed
As if it could not be,
And some folks thought ’twas a dream they’d dreamed
Of sailing that beautiful sea —
But I shall name you the fishermen three:
Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.

Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes,
And Nod is a little head,
And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies
Is a wee one’s trundle bed.
So shut your eyes while mother sings
Of wonderful sights that be,
And you shall see the beautiful things
As you rock in the misty sea,
Where the old shoe rocked the fishermen three:
Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.

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Homemade Pizza Recipe

Friday is pizza night and it has arrived, and I’m pretty excited about the weekend ahead. I have a feeling it’s going to be a good one. A great way to start is by making your own pizza. Thanks to Julien.

Ingredients

Pizza Dough: Makes enough dough for two 10-12 inch pizzas

  • 1 1/2 cups (355 ml) warm water
  • 1 package of active dry yeast
  • 3 3/4 cups (490 g) bread flour
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar

Pizza Ingredients

  • Olive oil
  • Cornmeal
  • Tomato Sauce or Italian Passata
  • Fresh soft mozzarella cheese
  • Parmesan cheese, grated
  • Mushrooms thinly sliced
  • Bell peppers thinly sliced
  • Italian pepperoni thinly sliced
  • Italian sausage, cooked ahead and crumble
  • Chopped fresh basil
  • Onions, thinly sliced raw or caramelized
  • Ham, thinly sliced
  • Feta cheese optional
  • Goat cheese optional
  • Anchovies optional

Make your own Pizza Dough

1 Use instant yeast” instead of “active yeast”, no proofing is required. Just add to the flour in the next step.)

2 Make and knead the pizza dough: Mix in the flour, salt, sugar, and olive oil and yeast. Just so easy to mix with your hands.

Knead the pizza dough on low to medium speed using the dough hook about 7-10 minutes.

You don’t have a mixer, you can mix the ingredients together and knead them by hand.

The dough should be a little sticky, or tacky to the touch. If it’s too wet, sprinkle in a little more flour.

3. Let the dough rise: Spread a thin layer of olive oil over the inside of a large bowl. Place the pizza dough in the bowl and turn it around so that it gets coated with the oil.

A quick fermentation (1 1/2 hours in a warm place) will allow the dough to rise sufficiently to work with.

Cover the dough with plastic wrap. And prep your toppings for your pizza.

Preparing the pizza

1. Preheat pizza stone (or pizza pan or baking sheet): Place a pizza stone on a rack in the lower third of your oven. Preheat the oven to 475°F for at least 30 minutes, preferably an hour.

2. Divide the dough into two balls: Remove the plastic cover from the dough. Dust your hands with flour and push the dough down so it deflates a bit. Divide the dough in half.

Form two round balls of dough. Place each in its own bowl, cover with plastic and let sit for 15 minutes (or up to 2 hours).

3. Prep toppings: Prepare your desired toppings. Note that you are not going to want to load up each pizza with a lot of toppings as the crust will end up not crisp that way.

About a third a cup each of tomato sauce and cheese would be sufficient for one pizza. One to two mushrooms thinly sliced will cover a pizza.

4. Flatten dough ball, and stretch out into a round: Working one ball of dough at a time, take one ball of dough and flatten it with your hands on a slightly floured work surface.

Starting at the center and working outwards, use your fingertips to press the dough to 1/2-inch thick. Turn and stretch the dough until it will not stretch further.

Let the dough relax 5 minutes and then continue to stretch it until it reaches the desired diameter – 10 to 12 inches.

You can also hold up the edges of the dough with your fingers, letting the dough hang and stretch, while working around the edges of the dough.

Use your palm to flatten the edge of the dough where it is thicker. Pinch the edges if you want to form a lip.

5. Brush dough top with olive oil: Use your finger tips to press down and make dents along the surface of the dough to prevent bubbling. Brush the top of the dough with olive oil (to prevent it from getting soggy from the toppings). Let rest another 10-15 minutes.

Repeat with the second ball of dough.

6. Sprinkle pizza pan with corn meal, put flattened dough on top: Lightly sprinkle your pizza pan or flat baking sheet with corn meal. (The corn meal will act as little ball bearings to help move the pizza from the pizza peel into the oven.)

7. Spread with tomato sauce and sprinkle with toppings

8. Bake the pizzas one at a time until the crust is browned and the cheese is golden, about 10-15 minutes. If you want, toward the end of the cooking time you can sprinkle on a little more cheese.

Also you can Add rocket or pineapple!

Enjoy!

Night Sky Map

Last night there above from my view of the night sky from the Swansea Valley… above is the Constellation Orion. It was a very cold, clear and frosty night.

Out of all the constellations in the night sky, it’s one of my favourites and one of the most well known.

The constellation Orion not only has Greek, but origins in Sumerian mythology, specifically in the myth of Gilgamesh. Sumerians associated it with the story of their hero fighting the bull of heaven, represented by Taurus.

They called Orion URU AN-NA, which means “the light of heaven.” Their name for the constellation Taurus was GUD AN-NA, or “the bull of heaven.”

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/night/uk/swansea

The Interactive Night Sky Map simulates the sky above Swansea on a date of your choice. Use it to locate a planet, the Moon, or the Sun and track their movements across the sky. The map also shows the phases of the Moon, and all solar and lunar eclipses.

And just looking up at the winter sky, I just can’t help but notice this celestial wonder; probably the most striking of all the constellations.

Orion is on the celestial equator, visible from the northern hemisphere. A constellation of seven bright stars.

It is the true north; a winter constellation right here over Wales.

Moon Talk

There is a harvest moon over Swansea. Makes me stay up late at night. Bedtime conversations wanting to talk about the Brexit and other things. Then when your sleeping, I talk about the moon; he tells me about the sun and all I can talk about is you.”

It’s touching to know that we’ve connected in a way that we want to remember.

Connecting with another human being is poetry to me. I think writing allows us to let others know how we feel about someone.

It’s more than words; it’s a feeling, where they are coming from, the spark and what makes the world go round and the things that breaks us too.

Every word is a piece of a puzzle; some words we look for; what I look for when I write and poetry is no exception.

Do you ever wonder if the poem your reading is about you?

I’ve always described myself as someone who can easily express feelings on paper.

I have found that through writing, that it is just my way of expression of whatever feelings we have shared.

Words that would not go on their own way, but words of affection that should not be left unsaid.

I’ve written the most about the conversations we’ve had and then later translated the spoken words onto paper; finding there is more than one way to express desire.

I will talk to the moon about us and share all my emotions and wanted you to know I can still feel everything that I’ve ever felt for you; and when the moon goes to bed and when the sun comes up again; those feelings still remain.

I just went outside last night to have a late night conversation with the moon. He just wanted to talk about the sun and I all could talk about is about was you.

Chill With The Moon

“There’s an electricity in the moon. A pulse of magic, an energy. A bewitching entrancement unlike that of the sun.” ~ Unknown

The moon is for things unseen, things undone in the shadows and beneath the fog of night.

It’s for receding tides and waves upon rocky shores and pirates hidden coves — it’s for wild hearts and unconcerned minds.

It’s where plans are made in the dark and secrets revealed under the soft haze of light… it’s a reflection upon the water coming through the clouds long after dark.

Only after dark can we learn, absorb and study the effects of the day. It’s self reflection that we take the time to make.

Sometimes I get the urge to stay up late… that’s when the creative juices flow the most. It’s where I am left unencumbered by the craziness of day!

There is an attraction between the Moon and the Earth. The effects are not so obvious as an ocean tide. There are other forces are at work too.

We live on a peninsula; there is the bay, the channel and estuary and at night; there is the spherical symmetry of the atmosphere and lunar pressures; oscillations and pressure variations.

The weather phenomena’s are not conditional in Swansea. They are an exact and non-negotiable and we’re here in the middle of it.

And it is just fine with me to be under the moon in Wales with you.

Time to chill with the moon.

Rome

While we were in Rome, we visited the Pantheon from which was a former Roman Temple and is now a church, in Italy. It was commissioned by Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). Completed by the emperor Hadrian about 126 AD.

The exquisite building is circular with a portico made of large granite columns with a rectangular vestibule that links the porch to the grand rotunda under the dome with a central opening to the sky. I can see why Michelangelo visited so often. Certainly would be inspirational.

Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon’s dome is still the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome.

The height to the rotunda and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 142 feet (43 m).

It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman ancient buildings because it has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century.

The Pantheon has been used as a church dedicated to St. Mary and the Martyrs or in Latin “Sancta Maria ad Martyres” but informally known as “Santa Maria Rotonda”.

The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza Della Rotunda.

The Pantheon is Rome’s one of two most popular tourist destinations with over 4.2 million tourists per year, making them the world’s 37th most visited destination.

Merry Vintage Christmas

With a few ideas about get to started on how to begin celebrating the season; here it is. It is all about gathering family and friends, staying at home and sharing the best Christmas yet!

I will be featuring a few of my favourite table collections (which I think you’ll love too) that encourages you to create a relaxed food sharing experience this party season.

Under the Christmas tree, place thoughtful gifts for loved ones to open on Christmas morning – from popular and meaningful Vintage collectibles for gifting like a piece of Bone China, a Victorian tea sets and lots of blue and white and coffee mugs. Place candy and sweets in a cup, a candle, Ceylon Tea, or even a gift card.

It adds to the classic gift. Use a vintage; mix and match. You never know when someone’s vintage might be the gift that makes a difference in someone’s Christmas this year!

Pictured Above

One of a kind Vintage tea set by Baker Bros Meir bone China. A Victorian Floral Gilded 10 piece Tea Cup trio’s with extra Tea Side Plates. Made in England from the 1920’s. Back stamped.

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/