Maen Ceti; Great Stone of Sketty

Cefn Bryn overlooks Maen Ceti; a chambered cairn or burial tomb also known as Arthur’s Stone.  Maen Ceti or the ‘Great Stone of Sketty’ is one of the most well known dolmens in Wales.

The stone weighs between 25-30 tons. This capstone measures about 4 metres in length, over 2 metres tall and 2 metres in width.

It stands on a northward facing slope just below the crest of the northern end of the ridge-backed hill of Cefn Bryn stretching east from the Iron Age hillfort at Cilifor Top, north across Llanrhidian Sands and west to the mouth of the River Loughor or Afon Llwchwr where it flows into Carmarthen Bay.

To the north is the Loughor Estuary which separates Gower from Llanelli and Burry Port.
The hills skyline above the estuary are composed of rocks from the Upper Carboniferous, and mostly covered in green ferns and mountain grasses.

The hills are of the common land its where the animals roam and graze freely and it’s where the ground is hilly and fertile. This belt of rich farmland meets the north coast at a prominent, rounded hill with Iron Age fortifications around its summit.

Arthur’s Stone or Maen Ceti can be found on Cefn Bryn in the Gower Peninsula. This massive stone weighs over 25 tons and marks the site of two Neolithic burial chambers, dating from around 6000 years ago. The stone is one of Gower’s best known landmarks and has long been the subject of wonder.

Standing above the Estuary on Cefn Bryn, I feel the presence of this gigantic stone and wonder about the ancients who placed it here so many  thousands of years ago

For a long time, I believed that Arthur’s Stone is a feat of engineering similar to Stonehenge, where Neolithic people used very basic equipment to move the heavy stones into position and some were carried by glaciers during the last Ice Age.

Below the alter stones, you can see the pillar stones standing to create the burial chambers below and the smaller upright stones are there as support.

Arthur’s Stone measures 4 x 2 x 2 metres, but it was once much larger than this. A big piece of it, weighing 10 tons, broke off sometime around 1690 and can still be seen lying next to Arthur’s Stone today.

 The site of Arthur’s Stone was one of the first places to be protected under the Ancient Monuments Act of 1882.

This is my favourite place in the Gower.

References:

Barber, Chris., Mysterious Wales, Paladin Books, London W1X, 1987.

Hawkes, Jacquetta., A Guide To The Prehistoric And Roman Monuments In England And Wales, Cardinal, London, 1975.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cefn_Bryn

*The Gower Society, A Guide To Gower, The Publication Committee of The Gower Soc., (orig. prepared 1965. Edt. 1989).

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Dainty by Shelley

Up in Staffordshire, England at the Foley’s it was a place where they first made the Dainty. It is a teacup pattern by Shelley. One of the most beautiful and amazing pieces of pottery I have ever seen.

This is just one pattern incredible beauty was earlier known as Wileman & Co; a name they had been originally known as. Then they became the Foley Potteries originally before they were acquired by Shelley.

The first Shelley to join the company was Joseph Ball Shelley in 1862 and in 1896 his son Percy Shelley became the sole proprietor.

In the late Victorian period the Art Nouveau, The Foley potteries began making this style of pottery. Many other potteries were to make this design. It was so extremely popular, that Foley had to Patten the name Shelley.

Others potters follow this design like Paragon, Queen Anne, Melba and Aynsley. But Shelley is probably best known for this very fine bone china “Art Deco” ware of the inter-war years and post-war fashionable tea ware.

Rowland Morris was a ceramic designer who actually created the Dainty cup shape for Percy Shelley.

This shape became the popular, especially in the USA after the 2nd World War, remaining in the Shelley family continuing in production until the takeover in 1966 by Allied English Potteries.

Over the years Shelley Pottery has been the icon of English Fine Bone China even though the Dainty has not been made since the 1960’s.

Its china and earthenware products were many and varied with the major output of tea ware.

The Shelley pieces remains to be quite a collectible as well as sought after with those who want to take their tea with refined discerning Victorian decadence.

View more;

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Late-Foley-Shelley-Teacup-Trio-Dainty-Teacup-Gilded-Fine-Bone-China-/263346047038?_mwBanner=1&redirect=mobile

Made in China

Chinese Blue White Teapot. Vintage

Chinese Blue Porcelain Teapot Mid Century

Octagon Hand Painted With

Chrysanthemum Top.

Deep, High And Wide.

Round ornate floral lid.

Blue octagon geometric around front and back with blue flowers.

Blue lotus spout. Porcelain handle with “O.” Some light fading around the base due to age.

Stamp on base: “Made in China.”

Made in Belgium

During the Belgian revolution of 1830 and the period of mutiny afterwards (1830-1839) the family BOCH had already acquired a long tradition in the field of faience and a lot of strategic experience in anticipating politic and economic developments.

Around 1874, due to the passionate interest of collectors of old faience pieces, Victor BOCH hires Dutchman from Maastricht, some already experienced after years of work in Delft. These Dutch faience painters brought their knowledge, experience and skills.

Thanks to their collaboration the old working methods were applied on different clay than the potters in Delft.

A period of reproduction of decors is followed by a period of innovation, among others with the polychrome decors on white background, or bleu, green or black, and afterwards new decors.

Luxury faience is decorated with Delft decors, and becomes a speciality of the “Manufacture” in a division named “la Chambre des peintres hollandais” (the Holland painter’s chamber).

These pieced each with a hand painted signature of the interlaced letters “B, F, K“ (Boch frères Keramis) on the bottom of the pieces.

These artistic products in Delft style are hand painted, instead of being decorated with a usual printed decor.

 

More at: visit my ebay store:

https://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Antique-Celadon-Boch-Freres-Keramis-Bowl-Ceramic-Lustre-ware-3-Available-/263252912835?_mwBanner=1

River Einion

A Waterfall
On the River Einion
There, the Dyfi Furnace remains
Where the waters once raced
To a mill from the top
With all its power
Leading to this waterwheel
Taking advantage of the powers
Of this river
From Cumbria via the Afon Dyfi
Where charcoal was once produced
Long ago from the local woodlands,
Where iron ore once burned;
But burns no more.

The Dyfi Furnace is in the village of Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales, adjoining the A487 trunk road from Machynlleth to Aberystwyth, near Eglwysfach.
The furnace was built around 1755 was only used for about fifty years to smelt iron ore. By 1810 coal burning had been abandoned. Today it remains a Grade II Building.

Richmond Park, UK


 

Clyne Garden, Wales

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Established in 1860 by Glynn Vivian, Clyne Gardens, consist 10,000 acres of land and include over 2,000 different plants including over 800 rhododendrons for which the gardens are renowned.

Clyne Garden holds National Collections of Pieris, Enkianthus and Rhododendrons. Due to the cool, wet and temperate local climate many plants thrive here not normally considered hardy for its latitude.

The gardens have extensive bog gardens, home to acres of wild garlic bordering the Swansea Bay.