Hot Chocolate Pot

Vintage Farmhouse Stoneware Studio Pottery. Is it a Tea / Hot chocolate/ Coffee Pot? It is a very versatile set for 4.

The set includes a footed pedestal tea or coffee pot, 3 footed bowls to hold tea or coffee and condiments with 4 cups and 4 saucers.

A hand crafted and finished stoneware Studio Pottery Set. A Pottery of earthenware with an embossed floral base in hand crafted earth tones and faint pumpkin colours and clay swirls.

The cups, bowls and pot have a Pedestal base. The saucers are daisy shape with scalloped edges and floral embossed wreaths.

Good condition with no chips, cracks or restoration.

Measures 18 cm high and 19 cm from handle to spout. 13 cm in diameter.

Includes:

1 Tea / Coffee / Hot Chocolate Pot

4 Cups

4 Saucers

1 Café bowl

2 Condiment Bowls – for sugar & milk

Lovely Harvest colours to get set for Autumn and Winter. Bound to keep friends and family warm.

Hathaway Rose

A rose with beautiful full double blooms,

With very attractive and frilly petals.

The blooms are good size;

clear, light and pink

In colour.

A high level of real rose

perfume.

She lives to produce

An open centred shrub,

Of medium size, fine and stem,

A carrying light

And green leaves.

She is elegant and refined

No less; love of variety.

Repeating, budding and flowering.

About Silver Teapots

An old English antique silver teapot is a lovely addition and very Shabby Chic addition in any home. I bought this one the other day. I was looking for something to put fresh cut flowers in for my table. But when I found this Teapot it was black with soot and grime.

What was I thinking? But anyway I decided to clean it only to only to discover it was real Silver…. an old English Silver maker; Mappin and Webb…. and

Just think… I was was going to put flowers in it after I cleaned the ole Mappin; We tested her… Jim heated the water. I watched her steam up nicely, holding in the heat. We poured. A cuppa of Ceylon tea. We added sugar; stirred. I sipped and closed my eyes. The taste was lovely.

It’s not all that hard to keep it in good working order and only requires minimal effort. Regular use and washing will prevent stains and tarnish from developing.

Wash the teapots in warm water with a mild, non-lemon scented dish washing soap, according to the English Silver smiths.

How to Clean a Silver Teapot

Step 1

Wet a cellulose sponge with water and wring it out. If the opening of the teapot is too small for your hand, wrap the sponge around a dowel or small spatula.

Step 2

Apply a quarter-size dollop of silver cleaning cream to the sponge. Silversmiths recommend using Silver Cream as a safe, mild cleaning agent.

Step 3

Rub the inside of the teapot with the sponge to remove tarnish and tea stains. Push the sponge into the teapot with the dowel if necessary.

Step 4

Dip a cotton swab in cleaning cream. Wipe the spout with the cotton swab to clean it.

Step 5

Rinse the teapot in warm water and dry with a soft, lint-free cloth.

Removing Tough Stains

Step 6

Fill teapot with warm water.

Step 7

Drop one denture cleaning tablet in the water. Wait ten minutes. The effervescing action of the denture tablet loosens tough stains and tarnish from the teapot.

Step 8

Pour the water into the sink and rinse the teapot with warm water. Gently brush any remaining stains with a wet brush.

Step 9

Dry the teapot with a soft cloth.

Red Clay

Yixing teawares are prized because their unglazed surfaces absorb traces of the tea, creating a more complex flavour.

For these reasons, yixing teawares should never be washed using detergents, but rather rinsed with water only.

Tea connoisseurs recommend using a separate type of tea cup for specialty teas. It you are a tea lover then you know to brew with the correct Teapot and drink using the right type of tea Cup. Use the proper cup when preparing

Don’t use the same white bone China cups with pink roses or ceramic mugs from the souvenir shops when drinking white, green, oolong, black, or puer) tea’s. Your tea will not achieve it’s full flavour. Also it’s a good idea to sometimes invest in new cups even when you drink only one variety of tea. Retire some of those old Sainsbury’s mugs with the cracklings in the bottom.

Early pots were designed for travel use hence you will see the simple classical look of the pots produced during the Ming dynasty. Most tea drinking enthusiast will have one teapot for travel use, these tend to be less expensive and compact in design. It was not until during the mid-Qing dynasty (18th century) that tea connoisseurs started to use the pot at home and the artisan begin to form them into different shape and sizes. Many exotic forms were conceived. Vessels were decorated with poetic inscriptions, calligraphy, paintings and seals were incised onto the surface of the teapots.

Chinese red clay tea pot set.

This includes Teapot, 8 tasting cups and aroma cups (sniffer cup). The teacups shown here is a service for 8 pairs. aroma cup and tasting cups. Specification for this Tasting set is Cup: Height: 30mm x Diameter: 50mm Capacity: 20 ml and

Aroma Cup: Height: 50mm x Diameter: 33mm Capacity: 20 ml.

The host serves the first Cup. It is the aroma cup is the taller of the two, and is where the tea is initially poured by the host.

To use aroma cup, hold the aroma cup upside-down over the tea.

Then hold the aroma cup to your nose and inhale. The guest then pours the tea into the drinking cup, smell and sip from the newly emptied aroma cup.

The aroma remaining in the cup smells noticeably different from both the aroma of the tea in the cup and that of the dry leaves, and changes subtly as the cup cools.

The guest then drinks from the round drinking cup.

Rinse in cold water when finished. Do not use soap.

The set includes 18 Pieces.

1Teapot

Tea Strainer

8 Aroma Cups

8 Sipping Cups

Great for travel in excellent condition.

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

Cornish Slipware Pottery

Vintage Slipware Jug from St Ives Studio Pottery in a Ceramic 3-D Pitcher From Cornwall.

Wetheriggs Pottery, had been used from 1855 as a brick and tile works and as a pottery from about 1860. The Schofields were employees there, and they bought the company in 1913. It was run by Harold Thorburn who was a member of the Schofield family.

The earthenware pots produced there were variously marked ‘Schofield’, ‘Wetheriggs’, ‘Penrith’, ‘Cumberland’ and ‘Thorburn’. Any of these might be combined, and the word ‘Pottery’ included. There is also a suggestion that a monogram ‘TH’ was sometimes used. The monogram is on the bottom of the Jug.

Minimalist Buddha

We found this Buddha sculpture In Swansea the other day. I didn’t really know what kind of Buddha it was, but something spoke to me to take it home.

This minimalist beautiful art figurine depicts a Zen Buddha sitting in meditation. The artist utilises a unique design that suggests meditation, as the heart and mind rise above the loins. Hand-carved from suar wood.

The Buddha sits in meditation with no focus on the details of the eyes, nose and mouth. It was designed a detail-less which adds to the magic of the whole.

You can place a Buddha wherever it can be noticed by the eyes of another; it’s calming and serene. Often it will allow for holistic sensations and hence praise is bound to be received by you.

To me, a Zen Buddha is serene every which way you look at it. It’s very beautiful; one of the most extraordinary I’ve found so far.

Zen traces its origins to India but it was formalized in China. Chan, as it is known in China, was transmitted to Japan and took root there in the thirteenth century.

Chan was enthusiastically received in Japan, especially by the Samurai that wielded political power at this time, and it became the most prominent form of Buddhism between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries.

The immigrant Chinese prelates were educated men, who introduced not only religious practices but also Chinese literature, art, sculpture, calligraphy, philosophy, and ink painting to their Japanese disciples, who often in turn traveled to China for further study.

Art Carved

What is the condition that distinguishes us from animal, plant and from inorganic matter, including the capacity for growth, reproduction, functional activity, and continual change preceding death.

Every human story is a life written and represented; and from there we exist. There are the experiences where we feel real emotion; just as I know emotion is not a fictional pseudonym.

We seek to dream and dream about the things we seek; of a spiritual reality and a destiny greater than the merely mortal.

What are those things that are more than merely mortal? The author with a prose; the lecturer with an intended set of temporal actions to achieve an objective, the painter with oil and canvas; to that, it is their life, of their work and to its end is their purpose.

Reflecting about what we see and what it

creates within us is what gives us self worth; an appreciation for the things that surround us.

Maybe it allows us to inspired, to be motivated. Could it be that dependence on the sense of this desire of fulfilment is what gives us this sense of value to our life?

Is it this philosophy or is the aesthetics that answers the questions to these principles that gives beauty to these arts; to writing, to critical thinking, to language, thought, the appreciation of an old Dutch painting; and perhaps even to an angel face carved in wood from the 18th Century.

Me and Jim found him in a market together near the Louvre.

I don’t maybe, but I think things like this old Wood face is the aesthetics; in the beautiful philosophy when I look into the face of an art carved angel.