Montmartre Signs

Montmartre, a former artists’ village once inhabited by Picasso and Dalí, and home to the Sacré-Cœur basilica. There are sweeping views of the city from its steep. We walked the winding streets. Then road scooters all the way from Rue Lepic to the Arc de Triomphe near the Champs-Élysées at the center of Place Charles de Gaulle.

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About the Union Jack

I have been studying for the British citizenship test because I want a British passport. There are a lot of interesting topics. I don’t just want to memorise the answers; I want to know what it means to be British.

The Union Jack is a national flag belonging to the British. Uniquely British incorporating the symbols within the Monarchy of Britain, representing England (with Wales), Scotland and Northern Ireland.

To represent the Union Jack to the British is the quality of embodying a noble British character. It’s their Britishness. A quality that binds and distinguishes the British people and forms the base of their unity and identity and the expressions of their culture.

To agree to disagree and to own the readiness to debate are such habits. These behaviours are the symbols they have in common. They are familiar here; an iconic quality and readily identifiable within.

The British are good with dialogue and with the ability to discuss topics with legitimacy and authenticity which are intrinsically tied to the power relations in their politics.

The Union Jack is a British national identity symbol, enabling a belonging, common courtesy and community while respecting exchanges of expression.

The British have a right to gather and to protest. This is their Britishness and it can provoke a range of responses and attitudes, such as advocacy or to be indifferent, but it’s indifference without rejection.

The Union Jack associates these British ideals of pride and patriotism, democracy and tolerance.

I believe it emphasises the very nature of the people of the United Kingdom: and to be British perpetuates diversity, unity and strength. I love Britain and the Union Jack!

Aye Calypso

To sail on a dream on a crystal clear ocean
To ride on the crest of a wild raging storm
To work in the service of life and the living
In search of the answers to questions unknown
To be part of the movement and part of the growing
Part of beginning to understand

Aye, Calypso, the places you’ve been to
The things that you’ve taught us, the stories you tell
Aye, Calypso, I sing to your spirit
The men who have served you so long and so well

Like the dolphin who guides you, you bring us beside you
To light up the darkness and show us the way
For though we are strangers in your silent world
To live on the land we must learn from the sea
To be true as the tide and free as the wind swell
Joyful and loving in letting it be

Aye, Calypso, the places you’ve been to
The things that you’ve shown us, the stories you tell
Aye, Calypso, I sing to your spirit
The men who have served you so long and so well

Calypso by John Denver

Read more: John Denver – Calypso Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Le Château

Led by William the Conqueror, The French Normans took Britain from 1066 CE to 1071 CE by William who led Many hard fought battles.

William was not just a warrior, but he built castles, redistributed the land with the British people, contributing to architecture, village community and agriculture bringing with him a new language with tactics that ensured the Normans were here to stay.

The percent of modern English words derived from the language group Anglo-Norman French and French is 29%. A great number of words of French origin have entered the English language. The castle is Le Château in French.

The Normans saw the Norman elite replace that of the Anglo-Saxons; taking over the country’s lands.

The Church was restructured with incredible new architectural introduced in the form of motte and bailey castles and Romanesque cathedrals. Many of the Castles in South Wales are French Marcher Castles; Swansea and Oystermouth and Cadtle Coch shown in the picture above.

It was the beginning of French feudalism in Britain and it came much more widespread.

There the English language absorbed thousands of new French words, amongst a host of many other lasting changes which all combine to made the Norman invasion a watershed memory in the history of the English Language.

Ancient Roman Britain

www.archaeology.org/issues/323-1901/features/7195-a-dark-age-beacon

Oh Chihuahua

What can make you move,
Chihuahua
Can you feel the groove Chihuahua
What can make you dance
Oh Chihuahua!… 
ARTIST
Album: Visions
Released: 2003
Genre: Pop

A Bishop Palace

In Lamphey Bishop’s Palace was the retreat of choice for those medieval bishops seeking solace from the everyday stresses of Church and State.

The medieval bishops of St Davids were worldly men who enjoyed the privileges of wealth, power and status. Lamphey did not disappoint. A palace fit for a queen…or at least the occasional bishop.

What we see today is mainly the work of the dynamic Henry de Gower, the bishop of St Davids from 1328 to 1347. Thanks to his vision, elegant Lamphey became the ‘away from it all’ palace for high-ranking members of the clergy keen to play at being country gentlemen.

Bishop Gower’s great hall, 82 feet (25m) long, is a particularly fine architectural achievement and its sheer grandeur would have impressed even the most privileged of bishops. Equally well-preserved and detailed in their architecture are the western hall and inner gatehouse.

Lamphey’s gilded existence came to an abrupt end during the reign of King Henry VIII when many Church estates fell into the hands of the Crown.