Places in Sketty- Singleton Park

Parc Singleton Sgeti (Welsh)

Near Wynberg House in Sketty Swansea is Vivian Road and Sketty Green.

The village of Sketty is centred on Sketty Cross which are the junction roads to Gower Road, Vivian Road, De-la-Beche and Dillwyn Road is the amazing historic Singleton Park.

When you enter Singleton Park from Gower Road in Sketty; there to the north is a walk that leads down a shallow green valley, it’s open to beautiful flanked trees belted by wide open rolling hills of green spaces.

Those along the east are ancient lime, horse chestnut, sweet chestnut and pine trees. To the west of the walk is the Gorsedd Circle of stones.

The stones are known as the Gorsedd Stone Circle. It was erected in Singleton Park, Swansea in 1925 for the National Eisteddfod of Wales’ Proclamation Ceremony.

To the south of the Gorsedd Circle, set in the bank below the east side of the old kitchens and gardens that once served the Vivian Copper Barons of Swansea. Just below is a semi-sunk, water wheel in a stone pit that brought the water up to the house.

There are orchards of trees on the bank; mainly horse chestnuts, sweet chestnuts and conifers. Their fruits have fallen, some still green into the shade labored underneath its branches.

A small stream bed, with some rocks, runs southwards to a damp area made into a bog garden. A gravel path winds along the slope.

Near the south side of the botanical garden are the footings of a stone wall, probably the remains of the south wall of the original Veranda garden.

A flight of concrete steps in the middle leads down to a path flanked by fastigiate yews and a gravel terrace with seats. On the south boundary is a fence and hedge.

All this was part of the Veranda House was first built in 1799-1800 on land which had been part of Gwerniddiff Farm, on the site of the farmhouse.

The Singleton Estate as it had now become had amalgamated some 12 farms to amass 250 acres. By 1851 the Walled Garden had become the kitchen and flower garden that once served the needs of the Vivian family.

The property where the Botanical Garden is now of 44 acres includes the garden grounds, and former Vivian plantation. The seeds that were planted have sown, taken root in soil lined essays and poetry of the earth; Tended to with great care.

In 1847 John Henry Vivian purchased Veranda House for his son Henry Hussey Vivian and his wife Jessie. Within a year Jessie had died after giving birth to their son.


Henry was distraught and resolved not to live in the house and by 1853 only the estate lodge remained, the principal part of Veranda having been dismantled. St Paul’s Church Sketty, was built as a memorial to Jessie.

The approach is the main and service drives from the north, a branch from the main drive leading to a small, rectangular walled garden to the west.

There are grounds to the north of the house that remain today and a narrow garden area, bounded by a wall, to the south. To the south of there was a rectangular orchard.

The old Veranda garden wall was retained, but a bigger area of c. 5 acres was enclosed to its north by a high; a curving wall, most of which remains today with a round tower.

The inner (Veranda) walled garden survived until at least 1914. It was situated on the area now occupied by the gardeners of the botanical garden. Its north wall is incorporated into the walled garden.

The footings of the garden’s south wall have been found in a flowerbed in the botanical garden.

The modern Swansea botanical garden has been developed on the part where the old Veranda House and Singleton Farm is now thanks to the Vivian Family.

Singleton park was originally part of the Vivian family Estate, which was purchased by Swansea County Borough Council in 1919 for use as a public park.

This is where I walk almost everyday. It is so beautiful I had to find out how it all became this and wanted to share the wonders of this place.

The brilliant legacy of Singleton will never fade. A fragile memory still lingers here in the colors of the trees and in the People who once call it home.

References;

http://orapweb.rcahms.gov.uk/coflein//C/CPG252.pdf

http://www.coflein.gov.uk/en/site/19964/details/singleton-farm

Rome

While we were in Rome, we visited the Pantheon from which was a former Roman Temple and is now a church, in Italy. It was commissioned by Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). Completed by the emperor Hadrian about 126 AD.

The exquisite building is circular with a portico made of large granite columns with a rectangular vestibule that links the porch to the grand rotunda under the dome with a central opening to the sky. I can see why Michelangelo visited so often. Certainly would be inspirational.

Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon’s dome is still the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome.

The height to the rotunda and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 142 feet (43 m).

It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman ancient buildings because it has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century.

The Pantheon has been used as a church dedicated to St. Mary and the Martyrs or in Latin “Sancta Maria ad Martyres” but informally known as “Santa Maria Rotonda”.

The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza Della Rotunda.

The Pantheon is Rome’s one of two most popular tourist destinations with over 4.2 million tourists per year, making them the world’s 37th most visited destination.

Elephant

While in Sri Lanka, we hunted and collected a few treasured from Galle and Kandy. While in Sri Lanka; we found some rare old Antique Petrus Regout Royal Sphinx Tea Cups, some old British empire spoons, climbed Sigiriya Rock and rode an Asian elephant.

The bowl looks like a small tea bowl or waste bowl; called spongeware. It has crescent moon and star inside. This particular piece of Spongeware was made for the Middle East, a tea bowl made from c.1883 to 1900.

It seems British and Dutch Empires were expansive with many diverse cultures serving in these Empire expeditions including the many religions who were Islam, Buddhist and Christian. As a result many types of pottery were made to serve these cultures during the colonisation of these empires.

Galle is a city on the southwest coast of Sri Lanka. It is known for Galle Fort, the fortified old city founded by Portuguese colonists in the 16th century. Stone sea walls, expanded by the Dutch, with architecture reflecting Portuguese, Dutch and British rule.

Ceylon was the country’s name then, known now as Sri Lanka. A British Crown colony between 1802 and 1948; a Buddhist nation but with a growing population of the Islamic people. The British ruled on the island and it lasted until 1948 when Ceylon gained it’s independence.

This old cup, considering the distance it has traveled and the age it is; it is amazingly in good condition and it remarkable it has survived. This bowl has fork marks. There is a small chip on the rim; but no cracks. There is crazing.

Most of the painting is still brilliant and on the outside and clear with the red crescent moon and star on white background inside. Glaze is good.
The Royal Sphinx stamp mark is clear on the base; Petrus Regout & Co. Maastricht Made In Holland.


Petrus Regout, in Maastricht, Holland. In 1836 Regout built a modern steam-powered pottery and was soon able to make ceramics that could compete with the best English products.
From 1880, his exports took off worldwide. From order books and correspondence with agents and buyers in the firm’s extensive archives, Petrus Regout sold these wares in Egypt, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Sudan, Turkey, Lebanon, Syria, the Arabian Peninsula, Iraq, Iran, British India and Indonesia.

More photos at:

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F263425059723

What Is Spongeware?

Traditionally spongeware was created on earthenware, which is defined as “some of the earliest clays used by potters, which is highly plastic, easily worked and containing iron and other mineral impurities.” Earthenware is usually fired at a lower temperature than stoneware, roughly 1745°F and 2012°F (950°C and 1100°C).

The earthenware provided a great base for the decorative spongeware to adhere to. Spongeware pieces are typically very functional, often things like mugs, bowls, vases and pitchers for use in the kitchen. For this reason, many pieces were made in molds. Once the piece was ready, a glaze was then applied to the surface piece in sporadic or in a deliberate fashion, dependent on what look the potter was going for.

Victorian Settings

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Victorian-Orchids-Tea-Plates-Adams-10-Pc-Set-Tea-Sandwich-Luncheon-Plate-Set-/263370370055 #dinner via @RiplApp

Christmas dinner is perhaps the most important meal of the year in most houses. It is a time for family and friends. They all return from the four corners of the world to be with their families for Christmas.

There are few occasions during the year when families are so fully reunited, hence the importance of the Christmas dinner table; when most of the chairs at the table will be filled.

Setting the perfect Christmas dinner table is different to setting a table at any other time of year, however formal the dinner, as the occasion calls for seasonal touches and decorations to make the meal festive and special.

Before you even begin to set the table, you should think about what colour scheme you want for your Christmas dinner table as this will help you choose the dinner plates. Having the right table cloth, crockery, cutlery and decorations.

Most people know that red and green are Christmassy colours, but if you want to do something a little different, you could go for purple and green, red and gold or even black and gold.

Setting the Table

So what will you need on the table? From a practical point of view, everyone will need a charger plate, side plates, a water glass, a wine glass, cutlery, a napkin and a soup bowl (if you’re serving soup!)

You’ll also need crockery for the table, serving utensils and placemats for hot dishes, Butter pat dish and bread plates. Mix and match your table, each person’s soup bowl does not have to match their charger plate.

Regardless, the most important thing about Christmas Dinner is….that you have enough plates and forks; that each guest should have at least two plates; a dinner plate and a side plate. That is your gift to them. It shows just how much you care you’ve taken.

Happy Holidays!

Cheese Please

It’s the night before Christmas

and all through the house,

There was a mouse stirring.

The people are laughing

Eating cheese and good festive food;

Christmas is fully planned,

The food on Christmas Eve

Is all about sharing.

This year, transform your table into a laid-back setting and encourage family and friends to tuck into a culinary free-for-all. Prepare big couscous salads, meats, stuffed courgette rolls, houmous, dips, olives and griddled bread and serve it on your vintage platters.

Vintage plates are perfectly suited to relaxed the dining experiences. Mix and match novelty plates, serving bowls, nesting jugs and serving trays in an array of blue porcelain patterns and pair with wooden sharing boards.

Don’t forget an after dinner Cheese, piled with your guests favourite blue, hard and soft cheeses, crackers and festive fruits like grapes and apples as accompaniments on of Cheese on vintage plates and Platters.

Pictured above:

Charming Ceramic triangle shape cheese serving plate with a mouse hiding in the corner. Made by Bassano from Italy.

Available at:

https://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Bassano-Ceramic-Cheese-Plate-Serving-Dish-With-Little-Mouse/263354793357?_mwBanner=1

Merry Vintage Christmas

With a few ideas about get to started on how to begin celebrating the season; here it is. It is all about gathering family and friends, staying at home and sharing the best Christmas yet!

I will be featuring a few of my favourite table collections (which I think you’ll love too) that encourages you to create a relaxed food sharing experience this party season.

Under the Christmas tree, place thoughtful gifts for loved ones to open on Christmas morning – from popular and meaningful Vintage collectibles for gifting like a piece of Bone China, a Victorian tea sets and lots of blue and white and coffee mugs. Place candy and sweets in a cup, a candle, Ceylon Tea, or even a gift card.

It adds to the classic gift. Use a vintage; mix and match. You never know when someone’s vintage might be the gift that makes a difference in someone’s Christmas this year!

Pictured Above

One of a kind Vintage tea set by Baker Bros Meir bone China. A Victorian Floral Gilded 10 piece Tea Cup trio’s with extra Tea Side Plates. Made in England from the 1920’s. Back stamped.

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

Dainty by Shelley

Up in Staffordshire, England at the Foley’s it was a place where they first made the Dainty. It is a teacup pattern by Shelley. One of the most beautiful and amazing pieces of pottery I have ever seen.

This is just one pattern incredible beauty was earlier known as Wileman & Co; a name they had been originally known as. Then they became the Foley Potteries originally before they were acquired by Shelley.

The first Shelley to join the company was Joseph Ball Shelley in 1862 and in 1896 his son Percy Shelley became the sole proprietor.

In the late Victorian period the Art Nouveau, The Foley potteries began making this style of pottery. Many other potteries were to make this design. It was so extremely popular, that Foley had to Patten the name Shelley.

Others potters follow this design like Paragon, Queen Anne, Melba and Aynsley. But Shelley is probably best known for this very fine bone china “Art Deco” ware of the inter-war years and post-war fashionable tea ware.

Rowland Morris was a ceramic designer who actually created the Dainty cup shape for Percy Shelley.

This shape became the popular, especially in the USA after the 2nd World War, remaining in the Shelley family continuing in production until the takeover in 1966 by Allied English Potteries.

Over the years Shelley Pottery has been the icon of English Fine Bone China even though the Dainty has not been made since the 1960’s.

Its china and earthenware products were many and varied with the major output of tea ware.

The Shelley pieces remains to be quite a collectible as well as sought after with those who want to take their tea with refined discerning Victorian decadence.

View more;

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Late-Foley-Shelley-Teacup-Trio-Dainty-Teacup-Gilded-Fine-Bone-China-/263346047038?_mwBanner=1&redirect=mobile