Made in Belgium

During the Belgian revolution of 1830 and the period of mutiny afterwards (1830-1839) the family BOCH had already acquired a long tradition in the field of faience and a lot of strategic experience in anticipating politic and economic developments.

Around 1874, due to the passionate interest of collectors of old faience pieces, Victor BOCH hires Dutchman from Maastricht, some already experienced after years of work in Delft. These Dutch faience painters brought their knowledge, experience and skills.

Thanks to their collaboration the old working methods were applied on different clay than the potters in Delft.

A period of reproduction of decors is followed by a period of innovation, among others with the polychrome decors on white background, or bleu, green or black, and afterwards new decors.

Luxury faience is decorated with Delft decors, and becomes a speciality of the “Manufacture” in a division named “la Chambre des peintres hollandais” (the Holland painter’s chamber).

These pieced each with a hand painted signature of the interlaced letters “B, F, K“ (Boch frères Keramis) on the bottom of the pieces.

These artistic products in Delft style are hand painted, instead of being decorated with a usual printed decor.

 

More at: visit my ebay store:

https://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Antique-Celadon-Boch-Freres-Keramis-Bowl-Ceramic-Lustre-ware-3-Available-/263252912835?_mwBanner=1

Brown Willow

1840’s Rare Small Pottery Footed Compote by Petrus Regout & Company. I Found in Paris.

It was made in Maastricht Holland in the Brown Willow transferware pattern.

This shape is hard to come by. Beautiful piece! Very old but Quality for its age. A Bright and shiny glaze.

Diameter: 3″ x 2″ height.

Royal Sphinx is a pottery, founded by Petrus Regout in 1834 in Maastricht. The factory origins from the glass-cutting company Petrus Regout & Co, established in 1827. In addition, Peter Regout started a wholesale company in glass, crystal and pottery.

In 1834 Regout started a glass factory and in 1836 he also started to produce pottery. Initially he produced so called faience commune, simple pottery with a soft, red shard, made for the local market.

In order to increase his market share, Regout had to compete with the then very popular English cream ware. This is why Regout employed skilled British workers, and even imported English materials. When his sons became co-directors, the name of the company was changed to Peter Regout & Co.

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