Dutch

Is there Art anything more beautiful than the Dutch old masters?

Dutch pottery cup bowls by Petrus Regout & Co. Maastricht Holland Bowl Lustre Transfer Ware Goudkust. Very Rare.

Pair of Petrus Regout Bowls. Antique Lustre Bowls. Very beautifully brilliant in The Earth tone. The Transfer Pattern is called Goudkust in Dutch. Stunning pair of twins aren’t they?

If I were to describe them; White footed, imagine Orange and brown Flowers, leaves, swirls and branches in earth tones. Beautiful Glaze. All the colours of Autumn. Leaves and Landscapes and Harvest.

They look veryExcellent for their age. The Lustre retained both on the outside is still beautiful. 1840’s original. These are twins; been around. They have a history. Victorian. Maybe they set at Table before Holland became known as the Netherlands.

Petrus Regout company that became generally known as ‘Société was renamed Sphinx in 1899. Around 1900 the products of Société Céramique vied with those of Sphinx in price as well as in quality.

Satsuma Plate

Japanese Satsuma Pottery in Gosu blue Satsuma: produced in limited quantity in Kyoto in the mid-nineteenth century; pieces with over- or under-glaze containing minerals such as cobalt or asbolite. Very collectible.

This process gives the hue and a more vivid quality to these delicate beautiful hand painted images.

Made for Harrods of London

Vintage limited edition Staffordshire fruit and veg bowl in pretty bone china made for Harrods by Bishop and Stonier (Bisto) dating from between 1891 and 1936. Numbered 232.

Hand painted flowers surrounded by a cobalt and in a gold plated design. All in good condition for its age except for hairline on underside. No crazing or chips.

This mark (Caduceus) was registered as a trade mark by Powell & Bishop in 1876 the mark was also used by subsequent partnerships including Bishop & Stonier.

The “BISTO” trade name was only used by
Bishop and Stonier and often appeared (but not always) with the two marks shown above.

Incredible find.

To view these items in detail; please visit my ebay store:

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

Made in Belgium

During the Belgian revolution of 1830 and the period of mutiny afterwards (1830-1839) the family BOCH had already acquired a long tradition in the field of faience and a lot of strategic experience in anticipating politic and economic developments.

Around 1874, due to the passionate interest of collectors of old faience pieces, Victor BOCH hires Dutchman from Maastricht, some already experienced after years of work in Delft. These Dutch faience painters brought their knowledge, experience and skills.

Thanks to their collaboration the old working methods were applied on different clay than the potters in Delft.

A period of reproduction of decors is followed by a period of innovation, among others with the polychrome decors on white background, or bleu, green or black, and afterwards new decors.

Luxury faience is decorated with Delft decors, and becomes a speciality of the “Manufacture” in a division named “la Chambre des peintres hollandais” (the Holland painter’s chamber).

These pieced each with a hand painted signature of the interlaced letters “B, F, K“ (Boch frères Keramis) on the bottom of the pieces.

These artistic products in Delft style are hand painted, instead of being decorated with a usual printed decor.

 

More at: visit my ebay store:

https://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Antique-Celadon-Boch-Freres-Keramis-Bowl-Ceramic-Lustre-ware-3-Available-/263252912835?_mwBanner=1

Blue and White

There is a true allure of collecting blue and white pottery. I believe it is that some people like myself…just love it. I love the design, the color, and the patterns.

Many have traveled across oceans; traded for a meal; served our family’s and Royalty. As our lives change; then suddenly we are able to appreciate the culture behind the art of the potter, instead of the pot being merely useful.

Old plates, vases and teapots, I think, have a secret history; I can imagine dinners with a silent backstory of conversations over tea and cake. Presentation is important. Make a fuss! It’s a shows love and respect to your family and your guests.

If you are going to collect blue and white; Buy pre-loved and or pre-owned. It’s keeps old pots out of landfills; recycle and reuse. We have to be mindful of our environment too.

My eyes have been caught up by the simple beauty of every day common pottery made remarkable by the colour blue and the brilliance of shape.

This is my table and I’m just getting started.

Old Ming Pot

Could it be Ming?

I am to believe I may have an antique Chinese koi Bowl from the Ming Period in my procession.

It is bronze and is a cloisonné enamel bowl. The bowl measures 11.2 inches across at its widest and 3.4 inches high.

The bowl is bronze with beautiful multi color enameling throughout the piece. The iron work and rims have a dark patina or color which is all original to the piece. Incredible find.

What makes this bowl very special is that the outside and interior of the bowl are decorated with fine and enamelings and there is a scroll border along the top rim.

The bronze is glazed in a dark blue green with gilded scrolls, koi and lotus flowers.

The center bowl is in excellent condition, as is the stand.

If you look at the many photographs for more on the look and condition as they are an important part of the description.

The Zhengde Emperor (Chinese: 正德; pinyin: Zhèngdé) was the Ming dynasty Emperor of China between 1505–1521.

Reign: 19 June 1505 – 20 April 15

What do you think?

Is it Ming…or just an old Ming Pot.

The Willow Pattern: History and Lore

The Willow Pattern: History and Lore

A plate of willow ware, the familiar household pattern, is the subject of one of the intalgio-gravure pictures illustrating “China and Pottery of Our Forefathers.”

Thomas Turner, who went from Worcester in 1772 to Caughley in Shropshire, brought his factory into prominence. His body and glaze soon rivaled Worcester, where he had learned his trade. Turner made a specialty of Chinese designs in blue under-glaze; and in 1780 he introduced the famous “willow pattern,” which was engraved for him by Thomas Minton.

The original copper plate, worn to the thinness of paper, the first and earliest rendering of this celebrated deisgn, is preserved at Coalport, a treasured relic.

Thomas Minton (born 1765), later to be a famous potter, was at first an engraver. He was apprenticed to Turner at Caughley, and afterward to Josiah Spode.

The Caughley willow pattern was introduced by Spode into Staffordshire in 1784, and it was taken up by Adams, Wedgewood, Davenport, and Clews, and at Leeds, Swansea, etc., with differences, particularly in the fretted border and fence in the background.

The story is of two faithful lovers. On the right hand side is seen a large and magnificent Chinese dwelling, by the side of which rare trees are growing. It is the home of a mandarin. His secretary, Chang, had fallen in love with the mandarin’s daughter, Koong-see. She loved in return, and they met clandestinely.

The mandarin, on discovering the affair, forbade the youth to come near the house on pain of death, and confined his daughter within the dwelling, also building a high wooden fence from the wall to the water’s edge. He also betrothed his daughter to a rich viceroy, Ta-jin.

The wedding was to take place when the “peach tree shall blossom in the spring.”

Koong-see watched with apprehension the budding of the tree, whose branches grew close to the walls of her apartment.

One day half a cocoanut shell floated on the waves. She found in it a paper containing a verse. It was from Chang. He threatened suicide. Koong-see wrote an answer, “The fruit you most prize will be gathered when the willow blossom droops upon the bough,” and told him to come for her.

The mandarin now brought Koong-see a box of jewels from Ta-jin, who soon arrived with his suite, and the nuptial ceremonies began. In the confusion Chang slipped into the house, and the lovers eloped; for “the willow blossom already droops upon the bough.” They gained the foot of the bridge by the willow tree.

The mandarin saw and pursued them. To represent the story there are three figures on the bridge, — Koong-see carrying a distaff (emblem of virginity); Chang carrying the jewel box; and the irate mandarin with a whip.

Chang and Koong-see took refuge in the humble house of two of Koong-see’s former servants. This is represented at the foot of the bridge. Here Chang and Koong-see were solemnly betrothed. The mandarin, having now issued a proclamation offering rewards for the return of his daughter and the person of Chang, soldiers came to the gardener’s house to read it. Chang jumped from the window into the river and returned with a boat.

Koong-see jumped into it, and the lovers were soon borne away on the rushing tide of the Yangtse Kiang and lost in the great mass of boats in that river. Chang bought an island with some of Ta-jin’s jewels, and the lovers settled upon it, building their house themselves.

The island is shown on the plate with its small trees. Several years elapsed. Chang had prospered by tilling his island, and now turned to literature. He wrote a book, which attracted the attention of Ta-jin. He discovered Chang’s residence. He vowed revenge. Had not Chang stolen his bride and — still worse — his jewels?

With a military escort Ta-jin sallied forth to attack the island, to seize Koong-see, and to kill Chang. The peaceful inhabitants were not prepared. Chang was run through the body and mortally wounded; his terrified servants fled; and Koong-see, in despair, set fire to the house, perishing in the flames.

The pitying gods now transformed Koong-see and Chang into two immortal doves, emblems of the constancy that united them in death. From the top of the willow plate, therefore, Kiing-see and Chang survey the scenes of their romantic lives.

Note

• Prepared as an article entitled “The Willow Pattern” by the editorial staff of the Mentor Association. Illustration for The Mentor, Vol. 3 No. 10, Serial No. 86. Copyright, 1915, by the Mentor Association, Inc.