BBC Radio 4 – In Our Time, Owain Glyndwr

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the fight for Welsh independence in the early 15th century
— Read on www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m00027xk

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Ancient Roman Britain

www.archaeology.org/issues/323-1901/features/7195-a-dark-age-beacon

A Bishop Palace

In Lamphey Bishop’s Palace was the retreat of choice for those medieval bishops seeking solace from the everyday stresses of Church and State.

The medieval bishops of St Davids were worldly men who enjoyed the privileges of wealth, power and status. Lamphey did not disappoint. A palace fit for a queen…or at least the occasional bishop.

What we see today is mainly the work of the dynamic Henry de Gower, the bishop of St Davids from 1328 to 1347. Thanks to his vision, elegant Lamphey became the ‘away from it all’ palace for high-ranking members of the clergy keen to play at being country gentlemen.

Bishop Gower’s great hall, 82 feet (25m) long, is a particularly fine architectural achievement and its sheer grandeur would have impressed even the most privileged of bishops. Equally well-preserved and detailed in their architecture are the western hall and inner gatehouse.

Lamphey’s gilded existence came to an abrupt end during the reign of King Henry VIII when many Church estates fell into the hands of the Crown.

Dainty by Shelley

Up in Staffordshire, England at the Foley’s it was a place where they first made the Dainty. It is a teacup pattern by Shelley. One of the most beautiful and amazing pieces of pottery I have ever seen.

This is just one pattern incredible beauty was earlier known as Wileman & Co; a name they had been originally known as. Then they became the Foley Potteries originally before they were acquired by Shelley.

The first Shelley to join the company was Joseph Ball Shelley in 1862 and in 1896 his son Percy Shelley became the sole proprietor.

In the late Victorian period the Art Nouveau, The Foley potteries began making this style of pottery. Many other potteries were to make this design. It was so extremely popular, that Foley had to Patten the name Shelley.

Others potters follow this design like Paragon, Queen Anne, Melba and Aynsley. But Shelley is probably best known for this very fine bone china “Art Deco” ware of the inter-war years and post-war fashionable tea ware.

Rowland Morris was a ceramic designer who actually created the Dainty cup shape for Percy Shelley.

This shape became the popular, especially in the USA after the 2nd World War, remaining in the Shelley family continuing in production until the takeover in 1966 by Allied English Potteries.

Over the years Shelley Pottery has been the icon of English Fine Bone China even though the Dainty has not been made since the 1960’s.

Its china and earthenware products were many and varied with the major output of tea ware.

The Shelley pieces remains to be quite a collectible as well as sought after with those who want to take their tea with refined discerning Victorian decadence.

View more;

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Late-Foley-Shelley-Teacup-Trio-Dainty-Teacup-Gilded-Fine-Bone-China-/263346047038?_mwBanner=1&redirect=mobile

Minerva by Royal Doulton

Royal Doulton Minerva range which dates from 1989.

Vintage.

More photos at http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

Made in China

Amazing Chinese Blue

Vintage and Chinese

A Porcelain Teapot

Born in The Mid Century

An Octagon shape

I think Hand Painted

With a Chrysanthemum

Lid, top and cover.

I am Deep, but wider than High

Round ornate and floral

Blue octagon in shape

And geometric around

White front, back and blue

Blue lotus spout I have

And a Porcelain handle

I am grand with the O on top

White, light and fading

Stamped on my base:

I was “Made in China.”

Art Carved

What is the condition that distinguishes us from animal, plant and from inorganic matter, including the capacity for growth, reproduction, functional activity, and continual change preceding death.

Every human story is a life written and represented; and from there we exist. There are the experiences where we feel real emotion; just as I know emotion is not a fictional pseudonym.

We seek to dream and dream about the things we seek; of a spiritual reality and a destiny greater than the merely mortal.

What are those things that are more than merely mortal? The author with a prose; the lecturer with an intended set of temporal actions to achieve an objective, the painter with oil and canvas; to that, it is their life, of their work and to its end is their purpose.

Reflecting about what we see and what it

creates within us is what gives us self worth; an appreciation for the things that surround us.

Maybe it allows us to inspired, to be motivated. Could it be that dependence on the sense of this desire of fulfilment is what gives us this sense of value to our life?

Is it this philosophy or is the aesthetics that answers the questions to these principles that gives beauty to these arts; to writing, to critical thinking, to language, thought, the appreciation of an old Dutch painting; and perhaps even to an angel face carved in wood from the 18th Century.

Me and Jim found him in a market together near the Louvre.

I don’t maybe, but I think things like this old Wood face is the aesthetics; in the beautiful philosophy when I look into the face of an art carved angel.