Satsuma Plate

Japanese Satsuma Pottery in Gosu blue Satsuma: produced in limited quantity in Kyoto in the mid-nineteenth century; pieces with over- or under-glaze containing minerals such as cobalt or asbolite. Very collectible.

This process gives the hue and a more vivid quality to these delicate beautiful hand painted images.

Bizen Ware Keshiki

Japanese Bizen ware Tea kettle. It is Reddish Green Brown pottery covered with a light brown and Ash glaze. With the potters mark.

Bizen; Keshiki, or in English view/landscape, refers to the different effects that form on the surface of Bizen ceramics during the firing in the kiln. This tea pot is one of the most common Keshiki to look out for, but Hi-Iro, pictured above; I think is one of the best of the many in the Bizen-Yaki has to offer in the Bizen Ware category;

Hi-iro, Meaning is “flame color”. Colors such as striking bright red or reddish-brown coat areas of the ceramics.

Aobizen

Ao means blue. A beautiful, yet subtle shade of blue dons the surface of the ceramics.

Botamochi

The shape and color look similar to the Japanese rice cake called botamochi, hence the naming.

Goma

Looks like a sprinkling of sesame seeds on the surface of the ceramics. Sesame seeds are known as goma in Japanese, hence the naming.

Hidasuki

Eye catching red scorch markings created during firing due to the clay being wrapped in straw.

Hi-iro

Meaning is “flame color”. Colors such as striking bright red or reddish-brown coat areas of the ceramics.

Kasegoma

A very desirable keshiki. The clay takes on a “crusty” texture. Usually a gray/silvery color.

Sangiri

Quite a varying array of colors, textures, and patches over the surface of the clay caused in the kiln during firing. One of the major keshiki and one that can give a Bizen piece an absolutely fantastic view/landscape.

Shiso-iro

a beautiful purple tone that resembles the leaf color of the perilla plant known as Shiso in Japanese. Iro simply means color.

Kinsai

Kin means gold in Japanese. Basically the surface of the clay takes on a gold color. Naturally a very sort after Keshiki!

Ishihaze

Small cracks that form around tiny stones that are used in the clay to create a desirable rough finish. The cracks are caused during drying and firing when the clay starts to shrink. The tiny stones don’t shrink, so sometimes they cause the clay to crack open around them.

This is regularly seen as a flaw in the western world, but is truly seen as aesthetic in Japan, and is dearly loved and prized for adding natural beauty to ceramics!

Chanoyu

The Japanese Tea Ceremony. The Japanese tea ceremony is called Chanoyu, Sado or simply Ocha in Japanese.

It is a choreographic ritual of preparing and serving Japanese green tea, called Matcha.

Tea is served together with traditional Japanese sweets to balance with the bitter taste of the tea.

Sadler Blue Willow

This is a vintage ginger jar, tea caddy is decorated with a Chinoiserie, Blue Willow pattern. The underside is stamped “Sadler England” and would date to the 1930s.

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

Blue and White

There is a true allure of collecting blue and white pottery. I believe it is that some people like myself…just love it. I love the design, the color, and the patterns.

Many have traveled across oceans; traded for a meal; served our family’s and Royalty. As our lives change; then suddenly we are able to appreciate the culture behind the art of the potter, instead of the pot being merely useful.

Old plates, vases and teapots, I think, have a secret history; I can imagine dinners with a silent backstory of conversations over tea and cake. Presentation is important. Make a fuss! It’s a shows love and respect to your family and your guests.

If you are going to collect blue and white; Buy pre-loved and or pre-owned. It’s keeps old pots out of landfills; recycle and reuse. We have to be mindful of our environment too.

My eyes have been caught up by the simple beauty of every day common pottery made remarkable by the colour blue and the brilliance of shape.

This is my table and I’m just getting started.

Red Clay

Yixing teawares are prized because their unglazed surfaces absorb traces of the tea, creating a more complex flavour.

For these reasons, yixing teawares should never be washed using detergents, but rather rinsed with water only.

Tea connoisseurs recommend using a separate type of tea cup for specialty teas. It you are a tea lover then you know to brew with the correct Teapot and drink using the right type of tea Cup. Use the proper cup when preparing

Don’t use the same white bone China cups with pink roses or ceramic mugs from the souvenir shops when drinking white, green, oolong, black, or puer) tea’s. Your tea will not achieve it’s full flavour. Also it’s a good idea to sometimes invest in new cups even when you drink only one variety of tea. Retire some of those old Sainsbury’s mugs with the cracklings in the bottom.

Early pots were designed for travel use hence you will see the simple classical look of the pots produced during the Ming dynasty. Most tea drinking enthusiast will have one teapot for travel use, these tend to be less expensive and compact in design. It was not until during the mid-Qing dynasty (18th century) that tea connoisseurs started to use the pot at home and the artisan begin to form them into different shape and sizes. Many exotic forms were conceived. Vessels were decorated with poetic inscriptions, calligraphy, paintings and seals were incised onto the surface of the teapots.

Chinese red clay tea pot set.

This includes Teapot, 8 tasting cups and aroma cups (sniffer cup). The teacups shown here is a service for 8 pairs. aroma cup and tasting cups. Specification for this Tasting set is Cup: Height: 30mm x Diameter: 50mm Capacity: 20 ml and

Aroma Cup: Height: 50mm x Diameter: 33mm Capacity: 20 ml.

The host serves the first Cup. It is the aroma cup is the taller of the two, and is where the tea is initially poured by the host.

To use aroma cup, hold the aroma cup upside-down over the tea.

Then hold the aroma cup to your nose and inhale. The guest then pours the tea into the drinking cup, smell and sip from the newly emptied aroma cup.

The aroma remaining in the cup smells noticeably different from both the aroma of the tea in the cup and that of the dry leaves, and changes subtly as the cup cools.

The guest then drinks from the round drinking cup.

Rinse in cold water when finished. Do not use soap.

The set includes 18 Pieces.

1Teapot

Tea Strainer

8 Aroma Cups

8 Sipping Cups

Great for travel in excellent condition.

http://stores.ebay.co.uk/littlebitoftexasinswansea/

Tea Ceremony

The Japanese Tea Ceremony

The Japanese tea ceremony is called Chanoyu, Sado or simply Ocha in Japanese.

It is a choreographic ritual of preparing and serving Japanese green tea, called Matcha, together with traditional Japanese sweets to balance with the bitter taste of the tea.

Preparing tea in this ceremony means pouring all one’s attention into the pottery and into each predefined movement. The whole process is not about drinking tea, but is about aesthetics, preparing a bowl of tea from one’s heart.

The host of the ceremony always considers the guests with every movement and gesture. Even the placement of the tea utensils is considered from the guests view point (angle), especially the main guests called the Shokyaku.