Lower Swansea Valley History- Hafod Works

https://youtu.be/BCT1rFB9weU

Vivian & Sons was a British metallurgical and chemicals business based at Hafod, in the lower Swansea valley. The firm was founded in 1810, disappearing as a separate entity in 1924. Its chief outputs were ingot and sheet copper, with sulphuric acid and artificial manures as by-products.

By the 1840s, the Hafod Works were the largest of their kind in the world, and their output represented one-quarter of the entire copper trade of the United Kingdom.

During the last decade of John Henry’s life, 1845–1855, his eldest son, Henry Hussey Vivian, managed the Works and took full control of the business on his father’s death.

The combined Hafod and Morfa Works site continued rolling copper until its closure in 1980.

The remains of the Hafod-Morfa Copperworks, originally developed by Vivian & Sons, consists of a core Grade II listed building and additional Grade II listed structures on a 12 acres (4.9 ha) site, on the banks of the River Tawe in Hafod, Swansea.

In 2010, the local authority discussed plans to have the site re-developed where the listed buildings would be preserved and new uses would be given to heritage buildings. The 2010 development plan included a new hotel, restaurant and new housing.

In 2011, the local council named Swansea University as a development partner of the site, who are evaluating the possibility of developing academic facilities at the site.

Public grants of £540,000 were awarded for the preservation and renewal of the site. Stage1 commenced in October 2013, clearing overgrown vegetation and undertaking essential preservation works.

References.

The Lower Swansea Valley Project, KJ Hilton – Geography, 1963 – JSTOR.

SC Bird – 1985 – University College of Swansea, Change and industrial redevelopment in the Lower Swansea Valley.

Dealing with dereliction: the redevelopment of the Lower Swansea Valley, RDF Bromley, G Humphrys – 1979 – University College of Swansea.

Parc Singleton Botanical Gardens