About Mountains

  
Mountains can seem like obstacles, but they are a good analogy for what may  seem to be an answer to an increasing imaginative part of the desire to discover a part of ourselves. Discovery is about the things happen that challenge us the most we see a block rather than an opportunity. Could it be in fact really the meaning and purpose of our lives to take advantage of this chance to climb?

At certain points in our life we all experience  a desire to be creative and discovering it is a powerful solace.  

When we are at the  bottom, at our lowest points, mountains, like all wildernesses, challenge our complacent conviction – so easy to lapse into – that the world has been made for humans by humans. 

Most of us exist for most of the time in worlds which are humanly arranged, themed and controlled. One forgets that there are environments which do not respond to the flick of a switch or the twist of a dial, and which have their own rhythms and orders of existence. 

Climbing the mountain corrects this amnesia. By speaking of greater forces than we can possibly invoke, and by confronting us with greater spans of time than we can possibly envisage, mountains refute our excessive trust in the man-made. 

Life is made up of  profound questions about our durability and the importance of our schemes. They induce, I suppose, humility with purpose and a desire not to give up, but to keep on climbing. 

References by Robert Macfarlane, Mountains of the Mind: Adventures in Reaching the Summit

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