Dear Diary ~ Venice Italy

IMG_0136

Venice, Italy, a beautiful city of romance and Renaissance; we were surrounded by water along the shores northern Italy, in the capital of Venice; Veneto; known as the city of lovers. It was a city of water of bridges and canals, spreading over 118 Islands. One of my favorite in the world because of its history, beauty, its romance; but mostly I loved it because someone very special shared it with me. So, this Valentines Day, I wanted to give back something very special. Photos are from iPhone 5s. August, 12, 2014.

IMG_0129

The city has a total of 150 canals and the most important canal in Venice is called the Grand Canal. It is responsible for managing the traffic in water by corridor management. Rather than visiting areas of Venice by car, it is very common to find water buses and water taxis that are used for transportation.

1280px-Canaletto_Grand_Canal_from_Palazzo_Flangini_-_JPGM

The Grand Canal in Venice from Palazzo Flangini to Campo San Marcuola is a painting by Canaletto in the J. Paul Getty Museum.[1] Painted around 1738, it may have been commissioned by the English merchant and art collector Joseph Smith (1682–1770). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Smith_(1682%E2%80%931770)

During the day time, the city is very crowded with visitors all across the world trying to experience what the city has to offer. Narrow yet beautiful canals, bridges and streets give a very different feel than many other places.

 

 

Motor boats are not allowed to travel in small canals that are narrow. The city has almost 400 bridges and the Grand Canal cuts the city equally into two proportionate halves from the north to the south. The total length of the Grand Canal is three kilometers. One of the constant threats that the city is the weakening infrastructure of the buildings.

 

1077px-Canal_Grande_Panorama2

The Grand Canal are lined with more than 170 buildings, most of which date from the 13th to the 18th century, and demonstrate the welfare and art created by the Republic of Venice. The noble Venetian families faced huge expenses to show off their richness in suitable palazzos; this contest reveals the citizens’ pride and the deep bond with the lagoon.

Among the many are the Palazzi Barbaro, Ca’ Rezzonico, Ca’ d’Oro, Palazzo Dario, Ca’ Foscari, Palazzo Barbarigo and to Palazzo Venier dei Leoni, housing the Peggy Guggenheim Collection. The churches along the canal include the basilica of Santa Maria della Salute. Centuries-old traditions, such as the Historical Regatta, are perpetuated every year along the Canal.

 

References:

M. Brusegan La grande guida dei monumenti di Venezia – Newton & Compton Ed., Roma 2005; ISBN 88-541-0475-2.
E. e W. Eleodori Il Canal Grande. Palazzi e Famiglie – Corbo e Fiore Editori, II ed., Venezia 2007; ISBN 88-7086-057-4.
Guida d’Italia – Venezia. 3a ed. Milano, Touring Editore, 2007. ISBN 978-88-365-4347-2.
Alvise Zorzi, P. Marton. I Palazzi Veneziani. Udine, Magnus, 1989. ISBN 88-7057-083-5.
Venezia e provincia. Milano, Touring Editore, 2004. ISBN 88-365-2918-6.
Raffaella Russo. Palazzi di Venezia. Venezia, Arsenale Ed., 1998. ISBN 88-7743-185-7.
Umberto Franzoi, Mark Smith. Canal Grande. Venezia, Arsenale Ed., 1993. ISBN 88-7743-131-8.
Giuseppe Mazzariol (a cura di). I Palazzi del Canal Grande. Novara, Istituto Geografico De Agostini, 1989.
Gianjacopo Fontana. Venezia monumentale – I Palazzi. Venezia, Filippi Ed., 1967.
Andrea Fasolo, Mark Smith. Palazzi di Venezia. Venezia, Arsenale Ed., 2003. ISBN 88-7743-295-0.
The Art and Architecture of Venice
Terisio Pignatti (a cura di). Le scuole di Venezia. Milano, Electa, 1981.
Silvia Gramigna, Annalisa Perissa. Scuole di Arti, Mestieri e Devozione a Venezia. Venezia, Arsenale Coop
Giuseppe Tassini. Curiosità Veneziane. Venezia, Filippi Ed., 2001.

8 thoughts on “Dear Diary ~ Venice Italy

  1. I saw this article on other blog. It had identical meaning but
    in a completely different words, they use
    advanced article rewriter, you should read about it, just
    type in google:
    Rynildhat’s Rewriter

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s